ischemia

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is·che·mi·a

 (ĭ-skē′mē-ə)
n.
A decrease in the blood supply to a bodily organ, tissue, or part caused by constriction or obstruction of the blood vessels.

[New Latin ischaemia, from Greek iskhaimos, a stopping of the blood : iskhein, to keep back; see segh- in Indo-European roots + haima, blood.]

i·sche′mic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

is•che•mi•a

(ɪˈski mi ə)

n.
local deficiency of blood supply produced by vasoconstriction or local obstacles to the arterial flow.
[1855–60; < Greek ísch(ein) to suppress, check + -emia]
is•che′mic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ischemia

Reduced blood supply to a part of the body or to an organ, especially the brain.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ischemia - local anemia in a given body part sometimes resulting from vasoconstriction or thrombosis or embolism
ischaemic stroke, ischemic stroke - the most common kind of stroke; caused by an interruption in the flow of blood to the brain (as from a clot blocking a blood vessel)
TIA, transient ischemic attack - brief episode in which the brain gets insufficient blood supply; symptoms depend on the site of the blockage
anemia, anaemia - a deficiency of red blood cells
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

is·che·mi·a

n. isquemia, insuficiencia de riego sanguíneo a un tejido o parte;
silent ______ silenciosa.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ischemia

n isquemia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other managements include an endovascular approach for stenting with or without balloon angioplasty and surgical management, reserved mostly for complicated cases like bowel infarction or widespread bowel ischemia (4).
What is done when endoscopic examination reveals borderline bowel ischemia in patients with sigmoid volvulus?
Based on the preliminary investigations, the patient was diagnosed with anterior STEMI and intestinal obstruction due to bowel ischemia. The patient was referred to the cardiology registrar and general surgeon on-call for review in the resuscitation room.
In the acute-care setting, radiologists should have a high index of suspicion for internal hernias in the setting of prior RYGB surgery and signs of obstruction, particularly given their association with closed loop obstruction and bowel ischemia mandating prompt surgical intervention.
PI may vary in clinical presentation, from asymptomatic forms to abdominal catastrophes with bowel ischemia, perforation and peritonitis.
Irreversible bowel ischemia may occur due to transmural infarction and loss of bowel mucosa integrity, resulting in more complications including bacterial translocation and potential metabolic acidosis, sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction, and death.[3] Anticoagulant therapy is successful in most cases, which then do not require surgical intervention.
We could not identify similar case reports, but entire and localized bowel ischemia can occur due to vascular and nonvascular causes identified due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis and mesenteric vascular disorders [1, 2].
Segmental mural thickening of at least one small bowel loop was noted which strongly favored acute bowel ischemia as a cause of his abdominal pain (Figure 2(c)).
A CT abdomen and pelvis showed prominent bowel loops with wall thickening, suggestive of bowel ischemia (Figure 5).
Circumferential torsion of an intestinal segment around its mesenteric origin produces symptoms of gastrointestinal colic, and if untreated may progress to bowel ischemia and perforation [1, 2].
Death is most commonly due to sepsis or peritonitis, while thrombus propagation into the superior and inferior mesenteric veins may result in bowel ischemia and infarction [7].
(8) Rarely, the condition may require surgical interventions like colectomy, hepatopexy, or laparoscopic colopexy if the patient develops complications like refractory ileus, colonic volvulus, or bowel ischemia. (9)