utility knife

(redirected from Boxcutter)

utility knife

n.
A knife with a small disposable blade that can retract into the handle when not in use. Also called box cutter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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6 The Outdoor Edge Slide Winder is a convenient EDC "knife" using boxcutter blades.
TOULON: Two people were injured in a town in southern France on Sunday when a woman shouting "God is Great" attacked two people in a supermarket with a boxcutter, prosecutors said.
Simply score them with a boxcutter, and then break off the desired pieces.
The Moroccan-born 25-year-old was allegedly armed with an AK-47 assault rifle, a pistol, a bottle of petrol, a boxcutter, a hammer and 270 rounds of ammunition.
You'll need some common tools to install the strap, including a boxcutter and pair of scissors (I found the boxcutter easier to use cutting the pre-scored plastic on the lever to snug-fit it to the power ring, while scissors easily cut the strap to fit).
An extensive ABC investigation found that the men were later arrested by the FBI after a boxcutter and foreign passports in the van and almost $5,000 in cash in one of the man's sock roused police suspicion.
It contains a basic first aid kit, water and food, flashlight, orange survival tent, emergency blankets, waterproof matches, ponchos, a combination whistle and compass, gloves (something we think is too often overlooked), AM/FM radio, camp stove and boxcutter (a poor survival knife).
According to the victims, Thorton swung a boxcutter at one of the victims multiple times, cutting the left side of the victim's nose and the area above his left eye.
There's something joyous in the raucous, disheveled thrash of Fitchburg rockers Boxcutter Facelift, with its gritty, grinding cacophony of noise on songs such as "I Like You Because You're Broken," "Ankle Deep in Poisonous Birds" and "Nobody Likes You." It's all a glorious, amplified, testosterone-fueled mess, and it's as primal and cathartic as you would hope it would be.
On the illustrated covers: clocks in every direction in front of the Saint-Lazare train station for Marie NDiaye's Comedie classique (1985); a sharp and ferocious boxcutter for Michel Maniere's Le Droit Chemin (The Straight Path, 1986); a bloody sink scattered with the hairs of Emmanuel Carrere's The Mustache (1986); elegant drawings of old photographs for Harry Mathews's Cigarettes (1988); a childish landscape for Mathieu Lindon's Prince et Leonardours (1987); a strange mauve and brown painting, Odysseus Before the Sirens, for Gerard Gavarry's Quarantaine (1990) ...
CURRENT FAVOURITE ALBUM: Grace by Jeff Buckley is my favourite of all time but recently I've been listening to Glyphic by Boxcutter.