brachylogy

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bra·chyl·o·gy

 (bră-kĭl′ə-jē)
n. pl. bra·chyl·o·gies
1. Brevity of speech; conciseness.
2. A shortened or condensed phrase or expression.

[Medieval Latin brachylogia, from Greek brakhulogiā : brakhu-, brachy- + logos, speech; see -logy.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

brachylogy

(bræˈkɪlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. a concise style in speech or writing
2. (Grammar) a colloquial shortened form of expression that is not the result of a regular grammatical process: the omission of "good" in the expression "Afternoon" is a brachylogy.
braˈchylogous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

brachylogy

the practice of conciseness in speech or writing.
See also: Brevity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition Pagan reviews indirect and direct discourse, formal types of speeches, Tacitus's fondness for polyptoton (the same word in different grammatical cases) and brachyology (omission of a verb).
I assume a surface reduction or brachyology of the sequence *yatha-yatha yad ...
This problem had already been partly discussed in Phaedrus: without its author present, writing always repeats the same thing when questioned ([Characters Omitted], 275e8-9), and Protagoras had contrasted its title character, a master of brachyology, with some sophistic orators who "like books, are unable to either ask or answer questions and when asked a simple question just keep on ringing like sounding bronze."(25) Theaetetus, however, presents a variation on the theme: Protagoras' fragment may say the same words repeatedly, but going over it again and again, taking it up with different assumptions about its author's intent, can make the single, unchanging text yield different meanings.