bracken

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brack·en

 (brăk′ən)
n.
1. A fern (Pteridium aquilinum) found worldwide, with large, triangular fronds usually divided into three parts.
2. An area with dense thickets of this fern.

[Middle English braken, probably of Scandinavian origin; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bracken

(ˈbrækən)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: brake any of various large coarse ferns, esp Pteridium aquilinum, having large fronds with spore cases along the undersides and extensive underground stems
2. (Plants) a clump of any of these ferns
[C14: of Scandinavian origin; compare Swedish bräken, Danish bregne]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

brack•en

(ˈbræk ən)

n.
1. a large fern, Pteridium aquilinum, of the polypody family, having large, creeping rootstocks and triangular fronds.
2. a cluster of such ferns.
[1275–1325; Middle English braken < Scandinavian]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bracken - fern of southeastern Asiabracken - fern of southeastern Asia; not hardy in cold temperate regions
fern - any of numerous flowerless and seedless vascular plants having true roots from a rhizome and fronds that uncurl upward; reproduce by spores
genus Pteridium, Pteridium - a genus of ferns belonging to the family Dennstaedtiaceae
2.bracken - large coarse fern often several feet highbracken - large coarse fern often several feet high; essentially weed ferns; cosmopolitan
fern - any of numerous flowerless and seedless vascular plants having true roots from a rhizome and fronds that uncurl upward; reproduce by spores
genus Pteridium, Pteridium - a genus of ferns belonging to the family Dennstaedtiaceae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

bracken

[ˈbrækən] Nhelecho m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bracken

[ˈbrækən] n (= plants) areas of bracken → zones fpl de fougères
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bracken

nAdlerfarn m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bracken

[ˈbrækn] n (plant) → felce f; (area of bracken) → felci pl
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Few animals recovered on treatment.INJECTABLE ANTIBIOTICSWhen I discussed the livestock management and environmental conditions with the paravet, I diagnosed red water disease mixed with bracken fern poisoning.
Detection of Ptaquilosides in different phenologic stages of Bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) and analysis of mik samples in farms with hematuria in Tolima, Colombia
Soon the trail followed a ridgeline that continued through the forest and eventually led to the first of several meadows that wowed us with lush bracken fern and blooming thimbleberries.
In addition to the tree leaves, rhododendron, iris, buttercup, yew, bracken fern, and rhubarb leaves are perhaps the easiest toxic plants to identify.
bracken fern and native raspberry, three kinds Of gum and a hundred
There are three main species of edible ferns: lady fern, bracken fern and ostrich.
We couldn't figure out what they were last night, but the internet has since told me they're made from starch extracted from the common bracken fern.
Some of the plants to stay away from include bracken fern, dock, hemlock, locoweed, milkweed, mountain laurel, oak leaf, rhubarb, sorrel, wilted wild cherry, and under certain conditions (decreased light, fast growth after drought, heavy fertilizers) johnsongrass, pigweed, lamb's-quarters, and alfalfa can accumulate toxic amounts of nitrates.
Archaeological evidence suggests that in the cooler southern areas, the Maori relied on the rhizomes of bracken fern, which replaced the burnt forests.