Bragg's law


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Bragg's law

 (brăgz)
n.
The fundamental law of x-ray crystallography, nλ = 2dsinθ, where n is an integer, λ is the wavelength of a beam of x-rays incident on a crystal with lattice planes separated by distance d, and θ is the Bragg angle.

[After Sir William Henry Bragg and Sir William Lawrence Bragg.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bragg's law

n
(General Physics) the principle that when a beam of X-rays of wavelength λ enters a crystal, the maximum intensity of the reflected ray occurs when sin θ = nλ/2d, where θ is the complement of the angle of incidence, n is a whole number, and d is the distance between layers of atoms
[C20: named after William and Lawrence Bragg]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Bragg's law, when a broadband source of light has been injected into the fiber, FBG reflects a narrow spectral part of light at a certain wavelength [14]:
Taking this into account, it is easy to realize that one of the most important optical properties of the colloidal crystals consists in light diffraction according to Bragg's law.
In this case, the radiation is scattered in a specular fashion by the atoms of the material and experiences a constructive interference in accordance to Bragg's law. For a crystalline solid with lattice planes separated by a distance d, the waves are scattered and interfere constructively if the path length of each wave is equal to an integer multiple of the wavelength.
Bragg's Law refers to the simple equation: n[lambda] = 2d sin[THETA] and describes the relationship between wavelength and the distance between the layers in a structured material.
The mathematical relation that governs this process, Bragg's Law, relates the diffraction angle to the X-ray wavelength and the lattice spacing in the sample.
Hence there is a reflection when the glancing angle satisfies Bragg's Law.
Bragg's law, [lambda] = 2d sin[[THETA].sub.B], was then used to determine the actual wavelength.