Bragg's law

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Bragg's law

 (brăgz)
n.
The fundamental law of x-ray crystallography, nλ = 2dsinθ, where n is an integer, λ is the wavelength of a beam of x-rays incident on a crystal with lattice planes separated by distance d, and θ is the Bragg angle.

[After Sir William Henry Bragg and Sir William Lawrence Bragg.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bragg's law

n
(General Physics) the principle that when a beam of X-rays of wavelength λ enters a crystal, the maximum intensity of the reflected ray occurs when sin θ = nλ/2d, where θ is the complement of the angle of incidence, n is a whole number, and d is the distance between layers of atoms
[C20: named after William and Lawrence Bragg]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
This value is equal with a number of wavelengths (n) for a strong beam (Braggs law)
The diffraction occured by the angle 2[theta] defined by the Braggs law. For residual stress of 1st type by x-ray diffracton determination is possible to get along the changes of stress spacing in the crystal lattice (Withers & Bhadeshia, 2001).
The diffraction occured by the angle 2[theta] defined by the Braggs law. For residual stress of 1.st type by x-ray diffracton determination is possible to get along the changes of stress spacing in the crystal lattice.