Brahmanism

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Related to Brahminical culture: Dharma, caste system

Brah·man·ism

 (brä′mə-nĭz′əm) also Brah·min·ism (brä′mĭ-)
n. Hinduism
1. The religious practices and beliefs of ancient India as reflected in the Vedas.
2. The social and religious system of orthodox Hindus, especially of the Brahmins, based on a caste structure and various forms of pantheism.

Brah′man·ist n.

Brahmanism

(ˈbrɑːməˌnɪzəm) or

Brahminism

n (sometimes not capital)
1. (Hinduism) the religious and social system of orthodox Hinduism, characterized by diversified pantheism, the caste system, and the sacrifices and family ceremonies of Hindu tradition
2. (Hinduism) the form of Hinduism prescribed in the Vedas, Brahmanas, and Upanishads
ˈBrahmanist, ˈBrahminist n

Brah•man•ism

or Brah•min•ism

(ˈbrɑ məˌnɪz əm)

n.
the religious and social system of the Brahmans, characterized by the caste system and diversified pantheism.
[1810–20]
Brah′man•ist, n.

Brahmanism, Brahminism

the doctrines and practices of Brahmans and orthodox Hindus, characterized by the caste system, a diverse pantheism, and primary devotion to Brahma, the creator-god of the Hindu trinity.
See also: Hinduism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brahmanism - the religious and social system of orthodox Hinduism
Hindooism, Hinduism - the religion of most people in India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal
2.Brahmanism - the religious beliefs of ancient India as prescribed in the sacred Vedas and Brahmanas and Upanishads
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In all probability the Vaidiks falsely inserted the myth that "Aryan culture" and "Vedic period" in the historical sequence anterior to Buddhism because they did not want to disclose that the Brahminical culture came after Buddhism.
But already very soon, already under the man who succeeded Basava as leader of the Virasaiva community, the community consolidated itself within the larger society around it, and under the influence of brahminical culture lost its revolutionary idealism.
Moreover, while trying to find social acceptability in a caste-ridden society, it has tried to pattern itself on the models of brahminical culture, language, values and norms as a crass negation of the aspirations of the Dalits who opted out of the same in protest against their oppressive potentialities.