traumatic brain injury

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traumatic brain injury

n. Abbr. TBI
Injury to the brain caused by an external force such as a violent blow to the head, resulting in loss of consciousness, memory loss, dizziness, and confusion, and in some cases leading to long-term health effects, including motor and sensory problems, cognitive and behavioral dysfunction, and dementia.
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Some estimates indicate as many as half of the individuals with brain injury have some history of substance use disorder, and about 30% of brain injuries occur while under the influence of alcohol or substances, DePrima says.
THE launch of identity cards for people with brain injuries comes as welcome relief for many in the North East.
THE launch of new identity cards for people with brain injuries comes as welcome relief for survivors in the North East.
But the fact is traumatic brain injuries caused by bumps, blows, jolts and other trauma to the head are a major cause of death and disability in the United States.
The selections that make up the main body of the text are devoted to mild traumatic brain injury, moderate to severe brain injury, cerebrovascular injuries, brain tumors, neuroinfection, neurotoxic and metabolic injuries, hypoxia, electrical and lightning brain injuries, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
com)-- Florida accident attorney Jim Dodson is pleased to offer a new resource for victims of traumatic brain injuries and their families.
A HEALTH board is calling on organisations to find innovative ways of simplifying cooking tasks for people with brain injuries.
When all of these symptoms have abated, people with mild traumatic brain injuries should gradually advance to more-intense schooling and activities, step by step, until the patient is back up to full activity.
Headway offers help to people who have suffered brain injuries and increases awareness of the life-changing nature of the injuries.
You need to train the correction officers to understand brain injuries so that when somebody may be acting rude or answering back or forgetting what they're supposed to do, it's not a sign of maladaptive misbehavior or disrespect, it's a sign of a brain injury,'' said Wayne Gordon, a brain injury expert.
It aims to help those with brain injuries build confidence in returning to an active lifestyle following their injury.
More people are surviving brain injuries thanks to the advances in medical knowledge and surgical techniques.

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