traumatic brain injury

(redirected from Brain Injuries)
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traumatic brain injury

n. Abbr. TBI
Injury to the brain caused by an external force such as a violent blow to the head, resulting in loss of consciousness, memory loss, dizziness, and confusion, and in some cases leading to long-term health effects, including motor and sensory problems, cognitive and behavioral dysfunction, and dementia.
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Based in Haddonfield, N.J., Bancroft annually serves 1,300 children and adults with autism, intellectual and developmental disabilities, and acquired brain injuries, through a wide range of programs.
A NEW support group for people with brain injuries is set to be launched in Liverpool.
Over the past 5 years, we have noticed that more and more vocational rehabilitation counselors who serve persons who are blind have persons with brain injuries in their caseloads.
Opened in 2003, the eight bed unit provides a residential rehabilitation for people with acquired brain injuries.
Chicago personal injury lawyer firm Passen Law Group declared on Friday that the company has been blogging on traumatic brain injuries in the month of March to raise awareness of brain injury causes, symptoms, statistics and prevention.
An estimated 75%-90% of the 1.4 million traumatic brain injury-related deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency department visits that occur each year in the United States are concussions or mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBIs) (1-5).
The Children's Trust is a national charity providing services including rehabilitation for children with acquired brain injuries (ABI).
Headway UK, the charity supporting people with brain injuries, has strengthened its regional activity with the appointment of a new North-East regional co-ordinator.
122), he wondered whether diet might also change how his patients coped with brain injuries.
The charity helps people with brain injuries after they have been discharged from hospital, when they often experience speech difficulties, memory loss, problems with thought processing, low self-esteem and worries about the future.
In response to the charge that g-forces on today's roller coasters are causing brain injuries, the industry's experts concluded that available medical literature does not show an association between increasing g-forces and the neurological injuries under review.
Although more people are surviving brain injuries than ever before, community services have failed to keep pace with demand.

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