electroencephalography

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e·lec·tro·en·ceph·a·lo·graph

 (ĭ-lĕk′trō-ĕn-sĕf′ə-lə-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures electrical potentials on the scalp and generates a record of the electrical activity of the brain. Also called encephalograph.

e·lec′tro·en·ceph′a·lo·graph′ic adj.
e·lec′tro·en·ceph′a·log′ra·phy (-lŏg′rə-fē) n.

electroencephalography

A diagnostic method of examining the electrical impulses of the brain using electrodes attached to the head and to a recording device to make an electroencephalogram.
Translations
elektroencefalografie
Elektroenzephalografie

e·lec·tro·en·ceph·a·log·ra·phy

n. electroencefalografía, gráfico descriptivo de la actividad eléctrica desarrollada en el cerebro.

electroencephalography (EEG)

n electroencefalografía (EEG)
References in periodicals archive ?
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