neuroimaging

(redirected from Brain imaging)
Also found in: Medical.

neu·ro·im·ag·ing

 (no͝or′ō-ĭm′ĭ-jĭng, nyo͝or′-)
n.
Radiological imaging that depicts brain structure or function.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Fact.MR has announced the addition of the " Preclinical Brain Imaging Market Forecast, Trend Analysis & Competition Tracking - Global Market Insights 2018 to 2026"report to their offering.
Scientists have developed an algorithm for brain imaging that measures its use of oxygen.
IANS | New York Artificial intelligence (AI) can help improve the ability of brain imaging techniques to predict Alzheimer's disease early, according to a study.
The 34 contributions discuss neuropathology and epidemiology, traumatic brain injury, brain imaging, assessment of cognition in African-American older adults, financial and medical decision making capacity, neuropsychological evaluation for vascular dementia, and the neuropsychology of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.
M2 PHARMA-August 27, 2018-MEGIN to provide TRIUX neo for functional brain imaging to Arkansas Children's Hospital
M2 EQUITYBITES-August 27, 2018-MEGIN to provide TRIUX neo for functional brain imaging to Arkansas Children's Hospital
Global Banking News-August 27, 2018-MEGIN to provide TRIUX neo for functional brain imaging to Arkansas Children's Hospital
It will integrate structural and functional brain imaging; genetic testing, and neuropsychological, behavioral, and other health assessments of study participants conducted over a 10-year period, yielding a substantial amount of information about healthy adolescent brain development.
In any brain imaging system, the antennas form an important element for the quality of the final image and the performance of imaging.
However, the affinity of IBVM to VAChT has not been reported [37, 38], and the accumulation of (-)-[[sup.123]I]IBVM (1) in the rodent brain may be insufficient for in vivo brain imaging for SPECT, considering the radiation dose and spatial resolution.
Of these, 19 underwent initial brain imaging and then a second scan one day after the high dose treatment.