traumatic brain injury

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Related to Brain injury: Head injury, Acquired brain injury

traumatic brain injury

n. Abbr. TBI
Injury to the brain caused by an external force such as a violent blow to the head, resulting in loss of consciousness, memory loss, dizziness, and confusion, and in some cases leading to long-term health effects, including motor and sensory problems, cognitive and behavioral dysfunction, and dementia.
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For teenagers with a brain injury these difficulties can be heightened.
A traumatic brain injury, also known as intracranial injury, is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, especially in younger individuals and has also been associated with the risk of dementia in older age.
7 million people in the United States have traumatic brain injury, and about 80% of those are thought to be mild," says Nicholas DePrima, PsyD, a psychologist and neuropsychologist at Palm Beach Neuroscience Institute and St.
There is a general lack of awareness of brain injury programs in Colorado, and we want to change that, said Judy Dettmer, director of MINDSOURCE.
The card is part of the charity's Justice Project, which aims to raise awareness of brain injury within the criminal justice system, and ensure survivors are identified at the earliest possible opportunity to ensure they receive appropriate support.
The Headway Brain Injury Identity Card is personalised to include the individual's photo and lists some of the effects they commonly experience so applicants are asked to provide clinical verification of their brain injury.
4 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) every year, but there have been few resources written specifically for victims and their families until now.
The community-based brain injury rehabilitation service provides assessment, intervention and support to service users with acquired brain injuries - through accidents, brain tumours and brain haemorrhages - to the whole of the North Wales.
That's worth saying again: people who've had a mild traumatic brain injury usually do not get knocked out.
The 38-year-old from St Helens said: "In the accident my car was a write off and I suffered a severe brain injury.
A crucial aim of the campaign is drawing awareness to this silent epidemic and the issues facing people with acquired brain injury.
You need to train the correction officers to understand brain injuries so that when somebody may be acting rude or answering back or forgetting what they're supposed to do, it's not a sign of maladaptive misbehavior or disrespect, it's a sign of a brain injury,'' said Wayne Gordon, a brain injury expert.

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