robotics

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ro·bot·ics

 (rō-bŏt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The science or study of the technology associated with the design, fabrication, theory, and application of robots.

robotics

(rəʊˈbɒtɪks)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (General Engineering) the science or technology of designing, building, and using robots
2. (Dancing) another name for robot dancing

ro•bot•ics

(roʊˈbɒt ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the technology connected with using computer-controlled robots to perform manipulative tasks.
[1941; coined by Isaac Asimov]
ro•bot′i•cist, n.

robotics

the application of automated machinery to tasks traditionally done by hand, as in manufacturing.
See also: Automation
the application of automated machinery to tasks traditionally done by hand, as in the manufacturing industry.
See also: Industry
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.robotics - the area of AI concerned with the practical use of robotsrobotics - the area of AI concerned with the practical use of robots
artificial intelligence, AI - the branch of computer science that deal with writing computer programs that can solve problems creatively; "workers in AI hope to imitate or duplicate intelligence in computers and robots"
animatronics - the construction of robots to look like animals (developed for Disneyland)
telerobotics - the area of robotics that is concerned with the control of robots from a distance
Translations
robotika
robotiikka
vélmenni
robototechnikarobotų technika
robotica
robotika

robotics

[rəʊˈbɒtɪks] NSINGrobótica f

robotics

[rəʊˈbɒtɪks] nrobotique m

robotics

n sing or plRobotertechnik f, → Robotik f

robotics

[rəʊˈbɒtɪks] nsgrobotica
References in periodicals archive ?
(4.) Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan, et al., "Changes in cortical network connectivity with long-term brain-machine interface exposure after chronic amputation," Nature Communications, Nov.
Lopez-Larraz et al., "A hybrid brain-machine interface based on EEG and EMG activity for the motor rehabilitation of stroke patients," in Proceedings of the 2017 International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2017, pp.
Soekadar, "Enhancing brain-machine interface (BMI) control of a hand exoskeleton using electrooculography (EOG)," Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, vol.
Donoghue, "Brain-machine interface: instant neural control of a movement signal," Nature, vol.
Identifying Engineering, Clinical, and Patient's Metrics for Evaluating and Quantifying Performance of Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) Systems.
While results are preliminary, Edward Chang, a neurosurgeon at the University of California, San Francisco, says he is working toward building a wireless brain-machine interface that could translate brain signals directly into audible speech using a voice synthesizer.
Offline decoding of end-point forces using neural ensembles: Application to a brain-machine interface. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng.
The brain-machine interface is based on a set of real-time decoding algorithms that process neural signals by predicting their targeted movements.
Scientists have made strides in brain-machine interface technology (SN: 11/16/13, p.
The brain-machine interface approach, pioneered at the Duke University Center for Neuroengineering in the early 2000s, holds promise for reaching this goal.
Not content to simply work around the problem with assistive devices such as exoskeletons, researchers are hot on the trail of actually treating paralysis using brain-machine interface devices.
It may also lay the groundwork for a brain-machine interface so that people with cerebral palsy or paralysis, for example, can guide computers with their minds.