electroencephalography

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e·lec·tro·en·ceph·a·lo·graph

 (ĭ-lĕk′trō-ĕn-sĕf′ə-lə-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures electrical potentials on the scalp and generates a record of the electrical activity of the brain. Also called encephalograph.

e·lec′tro·en·ceph′a·lo·graph′ic adj.
e·lec′tro·en·ceph′a·log′ra·phy (-lŏg′rə-fē) n.

electroencephalography

A diagnostic method of examining the electrical impulses of the brain using electrodes attached to the head and to a recording device to make an electroencephalogram.
Translations
elektroencefalografie
Elektroenzephalografie

e·lec·tro·en·ceph·a·log·ra·phy

n. electroencefalografía, gráfico descriptivo de la actividad eléctrica desarrollada en el cerebro.

electroencephalography (EEG)

n electroencefalografía (EEG)
References in periodicals archive ?
KARACHI -- Brainwaves produced during sleep helps us store new information in our memory, according to a study that explains how bedtime helps boost our learning.
Their work followed on from the key hypothesis that autism results from an excitatory and inhibitory imbalance in the brain, which is associated with repetitive brainwaves called gamma oscillations.
There are five different types of brainwaves - delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma - and each frequency has its own set of characteristics representing a specific level of brain activity.
Their caps are actually embedded with wireless sensors that monitor their brainwaves, as reported by South China Morning Post last April 29.
Slow and speedy brainwaves during deep sleep must sync up at exactly the right moment to retain new memories, according to new UC Berkeley research.
Research measuring brain electrical activity has found that the brainwaves of parents and their babies fall in sync when they make eye contact.
ISLAMABAD:Making eye contact with infants helps adults' and babies' brainwaves 'get in sync' with each other which is likely to support communication and learning.
ISLAMABAD -- Making eye contact with infants helps adults' and babies' brainwaves 'get in sync' with each other which is likely to support communication and learning.
Summary: Washington DC [USA], Nov 30 (ANI): Dear mothers, making eye contact with your babies can synchronise brainwaves with them, which in turn makes them learn and communicate more easily, finds a recent study.
The headset straps on, reads brainwaves, and with an onboard computer aims to influence the user's sleep at the right points with audio.
Neurologist Dr An Do, of the University of California, said: "Even after years of paralysis the brain can still generate robust brainwaves that can be harnessed to enable basic walking.