retrorocket

(redirected from Braking rocket)
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ret·ro·rock·et

 (rĕt′rō-rŏk′ĭt)
n.
A rocket engine used to retard, arrest, or reverse the motion of a vehicle, such as an aircraft, missile, or spacecraft.

retrorocket

(ˈrɛtrəʊˌrɒkɪt)
n
(Astronautics) a small auxiliary rocket engine on a larger rocket, missile, or spacecraft, that produces thrust in the opposite direction to the direction of flight in order to decelerate the vehicle or make it move backwards. Often shortened to: retro

ret•ro•rock•et

(ˈrɛ troʊˌrɒk ɪt)

n.
a small auxiliary rocket engine with its exhaust nozzle aimed in the direction of flight, used for decelerating a larger rocket, separating one stage from another, etc.
[1945–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retrorocket - a small rocket engine on a larger rocket or spacecraft that is fired to slow or alter its course
rocket engine, rocket - a jet engine containing its own propellant and driven by reaction propulsion
Translations

retrorocket

[ˈretrəʊˈrɒkɪt] Nretrocohete m

retrorocket

nBremsrakete f

retrorocket

[ˈrɛtrəʊˌrɒkɪt] nretrorazzo
References in periodicals archive ?
After MOM fires a braking rocket, the spacecraft will slip into an elliptical orbit that ranges from 350 to 80,000 km (220 to 50,000 miles) above the Martian surface--significantly farther out than MAVEN will orbit.
LADEE's month-long journey to the moon includes three highly elliptical passes around Earth, timed so that during the final orbit the probe will be far enough away to be captured by the moon's gravity after LADEE fires its braking rocket.
11, 1997, a braking rocket will maneuver the small spacecraft into a large elliptical orbit around the Martian poles.
When Messenger next comes to Mercury, on March 18, 2011, it will fire a braking rocket, slip into orbit, and finally begin an intensive year-long study of the planet.
After 10 minutes of high drama, the lurching spacecraft belatedly separated from the braking rocket that was causing the gyrations and began its fiery descent back into the atmosphere, still wobbling.
During a fourth and final meeting, in March 2011, Messenger will fire its braking rocket and settle into orbit around Mercury.