brame


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brame

(breɪm)
n
a fierce passion or vexation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Cllr Brame was then warned to "be careful" by other members, after the shock revelation.
Brame has more than 12 years of banking experience.
Brame was the last of a five-man gang to be sentenced as part of Operation Mailhouse.
"Red mangroves are used for nurseries by juvenile sawfish because that mangrove species is most commonly closest to shore," says Brame. "The sawfish are in there for protection and to forage.
The new study in the journal Crime and Delinquency provides the first contemporary findings on how the risk of arrest varies across race and gender, Robert Brame, a criminology professor at the University of South Carolina and lead author of the study, said.
"I think it's well worth it," owner Bob Brame says.
Aged just 15, Kitty Brame was one of only 2,000 people in Britain to contract Bechets Syndrome, an auto-immune condition causing inflammation to the blood vessels.
Bridesmaids were Laura Carlisle Bray, Paige Gholson Brewer, Jocelyn Aders Chambers, Suzanne Elizabeth Frye, Margaret Brown Havens, Cathryn Brame' Miller, and Anna Jayne Price.
Tu etanches ton amour inextinguible de la langue en citant, le regard mauve, une regle de grammaire, un verbe, une expression inspiree ou la recitation de [beaucoup moins que]la biche brame au clair de lune[beaucoup plus grand que].
The woman in the video, Sarah Brame, is in the middle of reeling in a fish when the clip begins.
He chatted to staff members Judy Brame and Janet Saavedra at the converted building on the corner of Conway Road and Glyn y Marl Road opposite North Wales credit union.