amino acid

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Related to Branched-chain amino acids: BCAAs

amino acid

n.
Any of various compounds containing an amino group (NH2), a carboxylic acid group (COOH), and a distinctive side chain, especially any of the 20 amino acids that link together to form proteins. Some amino acids (called nonessential) can be synthesized in the human body, while others (called essential) must be obtained through the diet.

amino acid

n
(Biochemistry) any of a group of organic compounds containing one or more amino groups, -NH2, and one or more carboxyl groups, -COOH. The alpha-amino acids RCH(NH2)COOH (where R is either hydrogen or an organic group) are the component molecules of proteins; some can be synthesized in the body (nonessential amino acids) and others cannot and are thus essential components of the diet (essential amino acids)

ami′no ac′id


n.
any of a class of organic compounds that contains at least one amino group, –NH2, and one carboxyl group, –COOH: the alpha-amino acids, RCH(NH2)COOH, are the building blocks from which proteins are constructed.
[1895–1900]

a·mi·no acid

(ə-mē′nō)
Any of a large number of compounds that are found in living cells, contain carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen, and join together to form proteins. ♦ About 20 amino acids are needed by animal cells to produce proteins, but only about half, called nonessential amino acids, can be produced by animal cells. The remaining half, called , essential amino acids, must be obtained from food.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amino acid - organic compounds containing an amino group and a carboxylic acid group; "proteins are composed of various proportions of about 20 common amino acids"
alanine - a crystalline amino acid that occurs in many proteins
asparagine - a crystalline amino acid found in proteins and in many plants (e.g., asparagus)
aspartic acid - a crystalline amino acid found in proteins and occurring naturally in sugar beets and sugar cane
canavanine - an amino acid found in the jack bean
citrulline - an amino acid that does not occur in proteins but is an intermediate in the conversion of ornithine to arginine
cysteine - an amino acid containing sulfur that is found in most proteins; oxidizes on exposure to air to form cystine
cystine - a crystalline amino acid found in proteins (especially keratin); discovered in bladder stones
dihydroxyphenylalanine, dopa - amino acid that is formed in the liver and converted into dopamine in the brain
essential amino acid - an amino acid that is required by animals but that they cannot synthesize; must be supplied in the diet
GABA, gamma aminobutyric acid - an amino acid that is found in the central nervous system; acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter
glutamic acid, glutaminic acid - an amino acid occurring in proteins; important in the nitrogen metabolism of plants; used in monosodium glutamate to enhance the flavor of meats
glutamine - a crystalline amino acid occurring in proteins; important in protein metabolism
glycine - the simplest amino acid found in proteins and the principal amino acid in sugar cane
hydroxyproline - a crystalline amino acid obtained from gelatin or collagen
iodoamino acid - an amino acid with iodine added
ornithine - an amino acid that does not occur in proteins but is important in the formation of urea
proline - an amino acid that is found in many proteins (especially collagen)
organic compound - any compound of carbon and another element or a radical
protein - any of a large group of nitrogenous organic compounds that are essential constituents of living cells; consist of polymers of amino acids; essential in the diet of animals for growth and for repair of tissues; can be obtained from meat and eggs and milk and legumes; "a diet high in protein"
creatin, creatine - an amino acid that does not occur in proteins but is found in the muscle tissue of vertebrates both in the free form and as phosphocreatine; supplies energy for muscle contraction
sarcosine - a sweetish crystalline amino acid
serine - a sweetish crystalline amino acid involved in the synthesis by the body of cysteine
thyronine - a phenolic amino acid of which thyroxine is a derivative
tyramine - amino acid derived from tyrosine; has a sympathomimetic action; found in chocolate and cola drinks and ripe cheese and beer; "patients taking MAOIs should avoid foods containing tyramine"
tyrosine - an amino acid found in most proteins; a precursor of several hormones
Translations
aminokyselina
aminosyre
aminohappo
acide aminé
aminokiselina
アミノ酸
aminoskābe
aminozuur
aminokwas
aminoácido
aminosyra
aminoasit

amino acid

nAminosäure f

amino acid

[əˈmiːnəʊˈæsɪd] namminoacido

ami·no ac·id

n. aminoácido, compuesto orgánico metabólico necesario en el desarrollo y crecimiento humano esencial en la digestión e hidrólisis de proteínas.

amino acid

n aminoácido
References in periodicals archive ?
Lab tests showed that brown fat could help the body filter and remove branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) from the blood.
The study, published in the journal Nature, also found that brown fat possibly filters the blood to remove branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs).
ISLAMABAD -- Many fitness protein powders that are commercially available consist primarily of whey proteins, which contain high levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs).
According to the study published in the Journal of Nature Metabolism, excessive consumption of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) may reduce lifespan, negatively impact mood and lead to weight gain.
Previous research has demonstrated that ACE inhibitory peptides have some common characteristics: i) The C-terminal tripeptide sequence strongly affects binding to ACE even though the underlying mechanism has yet to be completely established [20]; ii) C-terminal hydrophobic amino acids can effectively bind to the ACE active site [21]; iii) Di- or tripeptides with aromatic or branched-chain amino acids at the N-terminus and Tyr, Phe, Trp, or Pro at the C-terminus have interactions with ACE active site amino acid residues due to their strong affinity towards the ACE active site [7,22-24].
Within the refined profile, five clusters of metabolites emerged with prominent subpathways, including known mediators of lung disease such as sphingolipids (elevated in cases of WTC-LI), and branched-chain amino acids (reduced in cases of WTC-LI).
In the chronic period, increased levels of branched-chain amino acids and disrupted keto acid homeostasis can lead to disorders in neurotransmitter metabolism, chronic cognitive disorders, and mental retardation by altering amino acid uptake in the brain (2).
Impaired adiponectin signaling contributes to disturbed catabolism of branched-chain amino acids in diabetic mice.
[3] MSUD is a disorder of branched-chain amino acid catabolism, caused by a deficiency in the branched-chain [alpha]-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, which is responsible for the decarboxylation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), leucine, isoleucine, and valine (Fig.
* Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which promote muscle synthesis, (34,35) and
One of the main strategies used for this purpose is nutritional supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA).
Fifty-one patients with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma who were scheduled to receive local therapy (transcatheter arterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation) for their cancer were randomly assigned to receive a supplement of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) or no BCAAs (control group).

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