Branchiness

Branch´i`ness


n.1.Fullness of branches.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Falck (1786) wrote, "On the Volga one finds the wild hemp especially on the sites of former cities." He noted branchiness in the wildtype plants, "These give no straight and uniform fibers."
On the surface of granulocytes beside rhizopodia (the branchiness of which increased to 1.9 pm), long philopodia with a length of 3.5 pm appeared.
I really think that having it adjusted into these trees, and the "branchiness," and the organic things, lead me to notice that about the Nuds.
A critical length of a branch, nearest to the feeder, exists at which tuning of the track circuit becomes impossible (dependency on a branchiness).
Branchiness of Norway spruce in northeastern France: Modelling vertical trends in maximum nodal branch size.
Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that the approach commonly used by foresters, whole tree silvic characteristics such as branchiness, persistence of dead branches and leaf shape, is adequate for the identification of red/pin hybrids.
A log-level lumber grade assessment method based on branchiness was developed to bring lumber grade considerations into forest management planning.
Branchiness of Norway spruce in north-eastern France: Predicting the main crown characteristics from usual tree measurements.
This internal wood attribute (knottiness) depends upon external branchiness. Steele (1984) identified and discussed seven factors (e.g., log diameter, length, and taper) affecting lumber recovery in sawmills.
Tree characteristics such as tree size, tree taper, stem form, crown size, and branchiness are important in determining the yield and quality of black spruce lumber (Zhang and Chauret 2001, Zhang et al.