Brandeis


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Related to Brandeis: Louis Brandeis

Bran·deis

 (brăn′dīs′, -dīz′), Louis Dembitz 1856-1941.
American jurist who served as an associate justice of the US Supreme Court (1916-1939). His opposition to monopolies and defense of individual human rights formed the basis of many of his high court decisions.

Bran•deis

(ˈbræn daɪs)

n.
Louis Dembitz, 1856–1941, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1916–39.
References in periodicals archive ?
Exemplifying the best of the memoir genre, Brandeis tells a story that is both intimately specific and intensely relatable.
Exactly a century ago, President Woodrow Wilson nominated Louis Brandeis to the Supreme Court.
Brandeis Law Society on December 1, 2015, during the Societys annual Chanukah party and installation of officers at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia.
At Brandeis, we're doing this with an "experience is the best teacher" approach.
By virtually all accounts, Morris Berthold Abram was an inspired choice to lead Brandeis University when its founding president, Abram L.
WALTHAM -- Brandeis University is the latest college to come under scrutiny by the U.
Urofsky's account tries to "give us a sense of a man who is certainly greater than the sum of his parts," the reader is still left wondering about Brandeis the "inner man," wanting to know more about the person and less about the persona who often appears aloof, unshaken in his principles, and as never doubting his purpose or questioning the difficulties at hand (xii).
In this Article, however, I will focus on an "internalist" consideration, the role Justice Louis Brandeis played as a transitional figure in writing opinions that served as a bridge between the statist Progressives of the early twentieth-century and mid-century legal liberals.
Summary: One of the most fascinating, if problematic, recent incidents relating to the extent of allowable free speech in the United States took place this week when Brandeis University withdrew an invitation to the Somali-Dutch-American anti-Islamic firebrand Ayn Hirsi Ali to give a speech and receive an honorary degree.
PRINCETON (New Jersey) - One of the most fascinating but problematic recent incidents on the extent of allowable free speech in the United States took place this week when Brandeis University withdrew an invitation to the Somali-Dutch-American anti-Islamic firebrand Ayn Hirsi Ali to give a speech and receive an honorary degree.
Repeated Incursions at al-Quds U Raise Concerns at Brandeis, Bard An alleged clash between Israeli soldiers and students at a Palestinian university that involved tear gas bombs, injured students, and damaged buildings last month has prompted concern among some administration and faculty at Brandeis University.
Part of his career was spent at Brandeis University, where a symposium was organized last fall where more than 100 people from all phases of his career came together to celebrate the man and his achievements.