Brattain


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Brat·tain

 (brăt′n), Walter Houser 1902-1987.
American physicist. He shared a 1956 Nobel Prize for the development of the electronic transistor.

Brattain

(ˈbrætən)
n
(Biography) Walter Houser. 1902–87, US physicist, who shared the Nobel prize for physics (1956) with W. B. Shockley and John Bardeen for their invention of the transistor
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SMART - Volunteers needed for Head Start programs at Brattain Elementary School in Springfield and Fairfield Elementary School in Eugene to read one hour per week with preschoolers during the school year.
This event is for both women and men, as there will be a number of featured speakers such as local Gun Trust attorney Drew Dempsey, Jr.; Kathleen Ruppert a Crime Prevention Specialist with the Fayetteville Police Department, and Victoria Brattain of Down East Hearing Care.
For the invention of which electronic device did John Bardeen, William Shockley and Walter Brattain receive the 1956 Nobel prize for physics?
New Massachusetts champion is Mika Brattain of Lexington, a half point ahead of defending champ Alexander Ivanov, Denys Shmelov and Chris Chase.
In 1947, John Bardeen and Walter Brattain built the first functioning point contact transistor at Bell Laboratories, It was nearly classified as a military secret, but Bell Labs publicly announced the device in the following year.
The most prominent figures profiled are Bill Shockley, who led the group that included Walter Brattain and John Bardeen that developed the solid state transistor; Claude Shannon, widely known as the Father of information theory; communications satellite pioneer John Pierce; and physicists-turned-architects of Bell Laboratories, Frank Jewett and Mervin Kelly.
One Year Ago Today, Baseball Scribe John Brattain Passes Away (http://bizofbaseball.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4211:one-year-today-baseball-scribe-john-brattain-passes-away&catid=26:editorials&Itemid=39)
Does the list include the transistor by Shockley, Brattain and Bardeen in 1947?
Bardeen, junto con Waller Brattain y William Shockday, desarrollaron uno de los componentes esenciales para el computo moderno: el transistor de contacto-punto, el cual reemplazo los tubos de vacio (bulbos), permitiento que las computadoras redujeran importantemente su tamano.
Brattain and William Shockley invent the transistor.
Although Bell Labs assigned credit equally to Shockley, Brattain, and Bardeen, Shockley was jealous of his former colleagues.
Kilby and most of his peers in electronics are gone: Paul Eisler, Albert Hanson, Edwin Armstrong, William Shockley, John Bardeen and Walter Brattain. The first five or six decades of the last century boasted a disproportionate number of inventions that shook the earth.