breaker

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break·er 1

 (brā′kər)
n.
1. One that breaks, as a machine for breaking up or crushing a substance, such as rock, coal, or plant fibers.
2. A circuit breaker.
3. A wave that crests or breaks into foam, as against a shoreline.
4. One who break dances.

brea·ker 2

 (brā′kər)
n. Nautical
A small water cask, often used in lifeboats.

[Alteration of Spanish barrica; see barricade.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

breaker

(ˈbreɪkə)
n
1. a person or thing that breaks something, such as a person or firm that breaks up old cars, etc
2. (Physical Geography) a large wave with a white crest on the open sea or one that breaks into foam on the shore
3. (Electronics) electronics short for circuit breaker
4. (Mining & Quarrying) a machine or plant for crushing rocks or coal
5. (Agriculture) Also called: breaking plough a plough with a long shallow mouldboard for turning virgin land or sod land
6. (Textiles) textiles a machine for extracting fibre preparatory to carding
7. (Broadcasting) an operator on citizens' band radio

breaker

(ˈbreɪkə)
n
(Nautical Terms) a small water cask for use in a boat
[C19: anglicized variant of Spanish barrica, from French (Gascon dialect) barrique]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

break•er1

(ˈbreɪ kər)

n.
1. a person or thing that breaks.
2. a wave that breaks or dashes into foam.
3. a person indicating a wish to transmit a message on a CB radio, esp. on a channel already in use.
5. an implement used for breaking up rocks, soil, lumps of coal or ore, etc.
[1125–75]

break•er2

(ˈbreɪ kər)

n.
a small water cask for use in a boat.
[1825–35; perhaps alter. of Sp barrica; see barrel]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
comber, breaker, roller - A long curving wave is a comber, a wave that curls over and dissolves into foam is a breaker, and a long wave moving steadily shoreward is a roller.
See also related terms for wave.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

breaker

A wave in the process of losing energy where offshore energy loss is caused by wind action and nearshore energy loss is caused by the impact of the sea floor as the wave enters shallow (shoaling) water. Breakers either plunge, spill, or surge. See also breaker angle.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

Breaker

A large, heavy plow for the initial breaking of prairie.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breaker - a quarry worker who splits off blocks of stone
quarrier, quarryman - a man who works in a quarry
stone breaker - someone who breaks up stone
2.Breaker - waves breaking on the shorebreaker - waves breaking on the shore    
moving ridge, wave - one of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water)
3.Breaker - a device that trips like a switch and opens the circuit when overloadedbreaker - a device that trips like a switch and opens the circuit when overloaded
electrical fuse, fuse, safety fuse - an electrical device that can interrupt the flow of electrical current when it is overloaded
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

breaker

noun wave, roller, comber, billow, white horse, whitecap breakers on the sea wall
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
موجه كبيره
příbojová vlna
styrtsø
kicsapó hullám
brim
brekkerbrottsjø
sahile/kıyıya çarpıp kırılan dalga

breaker

[ˈbreɪkəʳ] N (= wave) → ola f grande
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

breaker

[ˈbreɪkər] n (= wave) → déferlante fbreak-even [ˌbreɪkˈiːvən]
n (also break-even point) → seuil m de rentabilité
modifde rentabilité
break-even chart → graphique m de rentabilitébreak-even point nseuil m de rentabilité
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

breaker

n
(= wave)Brecher m
(also breaker’s (yard)) to send a ship/vehicle to the breaker’s (yard)ein Schiff/Fahrzeug abwracken
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

breaker

[ˈbreɪkəʳ] n (wave) → frangente m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

break

(breik) past tense broke (brouk) : past participle brəken (ˈbroukən) verb
1. to divide into two or more parts (by force).
2. (usually with off/away) to separate (a part) from the whole (by force).
3. to make or become unusable.
4. to go against, or not act according to (the law etc). He broke his appointment at the last minute.
5. to do better than (a sporting etc record).
6. to interrupt. She broke her journey in London.
7. to put an end to. He broke the silence.
8. to make or become known. They gently broke the news of his death to his wife.
9. (of a boy's voice) to fall in pitch.
10. to soften the effect of (a fall, the force of the wind etc).
11. to begin. The storm broke before they reached shelter.
noun
1. a pause. a break in the conversation.
2. a change. a break in the weather.
3. an opening.
4. a chance or piece of (good or bad) luck. This is your big break.
ˈbreakable adjective
(negative unbreakable) likely to break. breakable toys.
noun
(usually in plural) something likely to break.
ˈbreakage (-kidʒ) noun
the act of breaking, or its result(s).
ˈbreaker noun
a (large) wave which breaks on rocks or the beach.
ˈbreakdown noun
1. (often nervous breakdown) a mental collapse.
2. a mechanical failure causing a stop. The car has had another breakdown. See also break down.
break-inbreak in(to)ˈbreakneck adjective
(usually of speed) dangerous. He drove at breakneck speed.
breakoutbreak outˈbreakthrough noun
a sudden solution of a problem leading to further advances, especially in science.
ˈbreakwater noun
a barrier to break the force of the waves.
break away
to escape from control. The dog broke away from its owner.
break down
1. to use force on (a door etc) to cause it to open.
2. to stop working properly. My car has broken down.
3. to fail. The talks have broken down.
4. to be overcome with emotion. She broke down and wept.
break in(to)
1. to enter (a house etc) by force or unexpectedly (noun ˈbreak-in. The Smiths have had two break-ins recently).
2. to interrupt (someone's conversation etc).
break loose
to escape from control. The dog has broken loose.
break off
to stop. She broke off in the middle of a sentence.
break out
1. to appear or happen suddenly. War has broken out.
2. to escape (from prison, restrictions etc). A prisoner has broken out (noun ˈbreakout).
break out in
to (suddenly) become covered in a rash, in sweat etc. I'm allergic to strawberries. They make me break out in a rash.
break the ice
to overcome the first shyness etc. Let's break the ice by inviting our new neighbours for a meal.
break up
1. to divide, separate or break into pieces. He broke up the old furniture and burnt it; John and Mary broke up (= separated from each other) last week.
2. to finish or end. The meeting broke up at 4.40.
make a break for it
to make an (attempt to) escape. When the guard is not looking, make a break for it.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.