breakwater

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Related to Breakwaters: Breakwall

break·wa·ter

 (brāk′wô′tər, -wŏt′ər)
n.
A barrier that protects a harbor or shore from the full impact of waves.

breakwater

(ˈbreɪkˌwɔːtə) or

breakwall

n
1. (Civil Engineering) Also called: mole a massive wall built out into the sea to protect a shore or harbour from the force of waves
2. (Civil Engineering) another name for groyne

break•wa•ter

(ˈbreɪkˌwɔ tər, -ˌwɒt ər)

n.
a barrier that breaks the force of waves, as before a harbor.
[1715–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breakwater - a protective structure of stone or concretebreakwater - a protective structure of stone or concrete; extends from shore into the water to prevent a beach from washing away
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement

breakwater

noun sea wall, spur, mole, jetty, groyne Suddenly a breakwater loomed up in front.
Translations
كاسر أمواج
vlnolam
bølgebryderdige
aallonmurtaja
hullámtörõ gát
brimbrjótur, hafnargarîur
vlnolam

breakwater

[ˈbreɪkˌwɔːtəʳ] Nrompeolas m inv

breakwater

[ˈbreɪkwɔːtər] nbrise-lames m inv, digue f

breakwater

[ˈbreɪkˌwɔːtəʳ] nfrangiflutti m inv

break

(breik) past tense broke (brouk) : past participle brəken (ˈbroukən) verb
1. to divide into two or more parts (by force).
2. (usually with off/away) to separate (a part) from the whole (by force).
3. to make or become unusable.
4. to go against, or not act according to (the law etc). He broke his appointment at the last minute.
5. to do better than (a sporting etc record).
6. to interrupt. She broke her journey in London.
7. to put an end to. He broke the silence.
8. to make or become known. They gently broke the news of his death to his wife.
9. (of a boy's voice) to fall in pitch.
10. to soften the effect of (a fall, the force of the wind etc).
11. to begin. The storm broke before they reached shelter.
noun
1. a pause. a break in the conversation.
2. a change. a break in the weather.
3. an opening.
4. a chance or piece of (good or bad) luck. This is your big break.
ˈbreakable adjective
(negative unbreakable) likely to break. breakable toys.
noun
(usually in plural) something likely to break.
ˈbreakage (-kidʒ) noun
the act of breaking, or its result(s).
ˈbreaker noun
a (large) wave which breaks on rocks or the beach.
ˈbreakdown noun
1. (often nervous breakdown) a mental collapse.
2. a mechanical failure causing a stop. The car has had another breakdown. See also break down.
break-inbreak in(to)ˈbreakneck adjective
(usually of speed) dangerous. He drove at breakneck speed.
breakoutbreak outˈbreakthrough noun
a sudden solution of a problem leading to further advances, especially in science.
ˈbreakwater noun
a barrier to break the force of the waves.
break away
to escape from control. The dog broke away from its owner.
break down
1. to use force on (a door etc) to cause it to open.
2. to stop working properly. My car has broken down.
3. to fail. The talks have broken down.
4. to be overcome with emotion. She broke down and wept.
break in(to)
1. to enter (a house etc) by force or unexpectedly (noun ˈbreak-in. The Smiths have had two break-ins recently).
2. to interrupt (someone's conversation etc).
break loose
to escape from control. The dog has broken loose.
break off
to stop. She broke off in the middle of a sentence.
break out
1. to appear or happen suddenly. War has broken out.
2. to escape (from prison, restrictions etc). A prisoner has broken out (noun ˈbreakout).
break out in
to (suddenly) become covered in a rash, in sweat etc. I'm allergic to strawberries. They make me break out in a rash.
break the ice
to overcome the first shyness etc. Let's break the ice by inviting our new neighbours for a meal.
break up
1. to divide, separate or break into pieces. He broke up the old furniture and burnt it; John and Mary broke up (= separated from each other) last week.
2. to finish or end. The meeting broke up at 4.40.
make a break for it
to make an (attempt to) escape. When the guard is not looking, make a break for it.
References in classic literature ?
Graham down by the brook, with a sketch-book in her hand, absorbed in the exercise of her favourite art, while Arthur was putting on the time with constructing dams and breakwaters in the shallow, stony stream.
The beds of this sea-weed, even when of not great breadth, make excellent natural floating breakwaters.
The Golden Fortune, therefore, backed by towering woodlands, looked out to sea at one side, across to the breakwater headland on another, and on its land side commanded a complete view of the gay little haven, with its white houses built terrace on terrace upon its wooded slopes, connected by flights of zigzag steps, by which the apparently inaccessible shelves and platforms circulated their gay life down to the gay heart of the place,--the circular boulevard, exquisitely leafy and cool, where one found the great casino and the open-air theatre, the exquisite orchestra, into which only the mellowest brass and the subtlest strings were admitted, and the Cafe du Ciel, charmingly situated among the trees, where the boulevard became a bridge, for a moment, at the mouth of the river Sly.
But it does seem a queer thing," he added, with a bitter smile, "that I who have a fair claim to nigh upon half a million of money should spend the first half of my life building a breakwater in the Andamans, and am like to spend the other half digging drains at Dartmoor.
On the other hand, I do not believe that any line of coast, ten or twenty miles in length, ever suffers degradation at the same time along its whole indented length; and we must remember that almost all strata contain harder layers or nodules, which from long resisting attrition form a breakwater at the base.
He stepped on to a stone breakwater that ran out from among the roots of the sand-hills, and so struck homeward, perhaps thinking our incubus would find it less easy to walk on such rough stones, green and slippery with seaweed, than we, who were young and used to it.
Anyhow, I heard Purvis taunting him with it, and threatening him with the breakwater at Capetown; and I begin to think our friends are friend and foe.
The clamour of Benares, oldest of all earth's cities awake before the Gods, day and night, beat round the walls as the sea's roar round a breakwater.
3) the execution planning has to contain the following scope: - specifications for the proposed floating breakwaters, including technical drawings, - work planning and static calculations of floating breakwaters, - details of anchorage / securing of shore breakwaters, including static calculations, - proof of kenter stability, - proof of floating stability according to din en14504.
Van der Meer contributes his scientific experience and Sigurdarson his practical experience in berm breakwaters to present a guide for the practical designer.
While acknowledging environmentalists' concerns about the environmental impact of extensive quarrying to provide the massive rocks used in constructing breakwaters.
KUWAIT, June 15 (KUNA) -- The Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) said on Wednesday it has won a US patent for inventing a new type of floating breakwaters aiming at preventing breaches from washing away.