Bretwalda


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Bret´wal`da


n.1.(Eng. Hist.) The official title applied to that one of the Anglo-Saxon chieftains who was chosen by the other chiefs to lead them in their warfare against the British tribes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cadwallon was amongst the dead and Northumbria was reunited under a new king, one who would soon be recognised as Bretwalda - king of kings.
His final book was an account, complete with accompanying sketches, of his service with the Royal Natal Carbineers in Italy during World War II - Apennine War Diary: An Artist's Sketch Book 1944-45 (Bretwalda, 2015).
His final book was an account with sketches of his service with the Royal Natal Carbineers in Italy during World War II: Apennine War Diary: An Artist's Sketch Book 1944-45 (Bretwalda, 2015).
On 24th March 2015, aged 80 years, John, member of Earsdon Lodge, Hon member of Bretwalda Lodge.
Offa, King of Mercians had claimed to be "Rex totius Anglorum patriae" (King of all England); Egbert, King of Wessex claimed to be "Bretwalda" (Ruler of Britain); Domnall was titled King of Ulster, and Fergus asserted he was King of Scots of Dalriada.
In the entry for the year 827 (really 829), his list is augmented by an eighth king, Egbert of Wessex, who, the Chronicle said, 'conquered the kingdom of Mercia and all that was south of the Humber, and was the eighth king who was Bretwalda'.
In addition to (and often in relation to) Bede, Wormald deals with Bede's abbot Benedict Biscop, Beowulf, the notion of an English imperium allegedly ruled by an overlord known as its Bretwalda, the tenth-century bishop AEthelwold, and the historical circumstances leading to the building and preservation of the Anglo-Saxon churches at Deerhurst and Brixworth.
(28) Egbert is designated a Bretwalda, a term that, I suggest, seems to imply a ruler of land.
Christianity in essence serves as an instrument to further the power wielded by the bretwalda. Higham seeks to define a growing symbiosis in the church-state relationship in which royal protection and patronage of the early Christian missionary effort provided the kings with a means of increased control over a growing Christian community within England.
To these seven, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of Alfred's time attaches not only an eighth name but also a vernacular word, 'Bretwalda', ('Britain-ruler') or 'Brytenwalda' (almost certainly the right form: 'Bretwalda' may be a 'ghost' word, born of a scribal slip).