Brezhnev Doctrine


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Brezhnev Doctrine

1968–89 Justification for intervention by Warsaw Pact countries in the affairs of member states. Promulgated by Soviet Communist leader Leonid Brezhnev (1906–82) to explain why five countries under Soviet control invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968 to quash the Prague Spring.
References in periodicals archive ?
The so-called Brezhnev doctrine (of irreversibility of communist gains) postulated the Soviet (Suslov-Stalin) equivalent to Honduras-ization - Finlandization.
Moscow: Izdatel'stvo politicheskoi literatury, 1985); John Norton Moore, International Law and the Brezhnev Doctrine (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1987); Joseph L.
After the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968, the so-called Brezhnev Doctrine came to light, following a famous speech delivered by then Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev in which he said, "When forces that are hostile to socialism try to turn the development of some socialist country towards capitalism, it becomes not only a problem of the country concerned, but a common problem and concern of all socialist countries.
Although the Bush Doctrine has some precedent in Cold Warera rollback, it was as alien to conservatism as the Brezhnev Doctrine.
In Moscow, Mikhail Gorbachev spoke of a "Common European House" and repudiated the interventionist Brezhnev Doctrine.
That same year, Gorbachev renounced the Brezhnev Doctrine, the imperialist foreign policy principle that justified Soviet military intervention in Eastern Bloc countries to "protect" socialism (the sort of action that was undertaken to put down the 1956 Hungarian democratic revolution, legitimized by Brezhnev after the fact, and which was repeated in Czechoslovakia in 1968).
This was the so-called Brezhnev Doctrine in which the USSR claimed the right to intervene in any country to protect a Marxist-Leninist regime.
1968: Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev issues the Brezhnev Doctrine.
Replace the word communism with the United States and the 1968 Brezhnev Doctrine morphs into the 2002 Bush Doctrine.
This was, it is pointed out here, an early version of Washington's current doctrine of pre-emptive war and regime change, and thus the talk in Moscow about "Bush's Brezhnev Doctrine.
He preferred to leave behind reformed socialist states, but he also made clear, and much earlier than Levesque suggests, that the Brezhnev Doctrine was dead and that the Eastern European regimes were on their own.