Brezhnev Doctrine


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Brezhnev Doctrine

1968–89 Justification for intervention by Warsaw Pact countries in the affairs of member states. Promulgated by Soviet Communist leader Leonid Brezhnev (1906–82) to explain why five countries under Soviet control invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968 to quash the Prague Spring.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Incidentally, the above story claimed: "The Saudi government provided the financing for Pakistan to secretly build up its own nuclear arms, the first 'Sunni bomb', as the Pakistani creators of the program called it." BREZHNEV DOCTRINE Now, an excerpt from Victor Sebestyen's "Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire" on how Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev allegedly lectured Czech leader Alexander Dubcek after Soviet tanks crushed the Prague Spring of 1968: "Your country lies on territory where the Soviet soldier trod in the Great Patriotic War.
The so-called Brezhnev doctrine (of irreversibility of communist gains) postulated the Soviet (Suslov-Stalin) equivalent to Honduras-ization - Finlandization.
(Moscow: Izdatel'stvo politicheskoi literatury, 1985); John Norton Moore, International Law and the Brezhnev Doctrine (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1987); Joseph L.
Likewise, the 1983 Grenada intervention caused "the end of the Brezhnev Doctrine" (p.
After the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968, the so-called Brezhnev Doctrine came to light, following a famous speech delivered by then Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev in which he said, "When forces that are hostile to socialism try to turn the development of some socialist country towards capitalism, it becomes not only a problem of the country concerned, but a common problem and concern of all socialist countries."
They are announcing, if you will, a kind of judicial Brezhnev Doctrine: "What we have, we keep." (35) More than anything else, the political theory and legal history presented in A Distinct Judicial Power indicates that the U.S.
In July 1989, the so-called "Brezhnev Doctrine" was replaced by what one Gorbachev adviser described as the "Sinatra Doctrine", based on the singer's popular song "My Way." In other words, the adviser said that East European countries were now able to go their own way--politically and economically--without fear of invasion by Soviet troops.
Although the Bush Doctrine has some precedent in Cold Warera rollback, it was as alien to conservatism as the Brezhnev Doctrine.
In Moscow, Mikhail Gorbachev spoke of a "Common European House" and repudiated the interventionist Brezhnev Doctrine. Yet when the Wall tumbled down, experts and world leaders alike were unanimous.
That same year, Gorbachev renounced the Brezhnev Doctrine, the imperialist foreign policy principle that justified Soviet military intervention in Eastern Bloc countries to "protect" socialism (the sort of action that was undertaken to put down the 1956 Hungarian democratic revolution, legitimized by Brezhnev after the fact, and which was repeated in Czechoslovakia in 1968).
This was the so-called Brezhnev Doctrine in which the USSR claimed the right to intervene in any country to protect a Marxist-Leninist regime.