natural theology

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natural theology

n.
A theology holding that knowledge of God may be acquired by human reason and observation alone without the aid of revealed knowledge.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

natural theology

n
(Theology) the attempt to derive theological truth, and esp the existence of God, from empirical facts by reasoned argument. Compare revealed religion, fideism, revelation3
natural theologian n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nat′ural theol′ogy


n.
theology based on knowledge of the natural world and on human reason, apart from revelation.
[1670–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural theology - a theology that holds that knowledge of God can be acquired by human reason without the aid of divine revelation
theological system, theology - a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings; "Jewish theology"; "Roman Catholic theology"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Ogg's by voting for one of the Bridgewater Treatises. Of course Lucy wished to know what these alarmingly learned books were; and as it is always pleasant to improve the minds of ladies by talking to them at ease on subjects of which they know nothing, Stephen became quite brilliant in an account of Buckland's Treatise, which he had just been reading.
Who today has heard of the Bridgewater Treatises? In 1829, the earl of Bridgewater left a will devoting funds to support the publication of essays "On the Power, Wisdom and Goodness of God as manifested in the Creation." A series of treatises appeared over the following decade, authored by some of the greatest minds of a dazzling age of scientific creativity, including such towering geniuses as William Whewell and William Buckland.