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Related to Briticisms: Britishism


 (brĭt′ĭ-sĭz′əm) also Brit·ish·ism (-shĭz′əm)
A word, phrase, or idiom characteristic of or peculiar to English as it is spoken in Great Britain.

[From Briti(sh), on the model of words such as Gallicism.]


a custom, linguistic usage, or other feature peculiar to Britain or its people


(ˈbrɪt əˌsɪz əm)

also Britishism

a word, phrase, or other feature characteristic of or peculiar to British English.
[1865–70, Amer.; British + -ism, with -ic for -ish on the model of Gallicism, etc.]

Briticism, Britishism

a word or phrase characteristic of speakers of English in Britain and not usually used by English speakers elsewhere.
See also: English
a word, idiom, or phrase characteristic of or restricted to British English. Also called Britishism. Cf. Americanism, Canadianism.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Briticism - an expression that is used in Great Britain (especially as contrasted with American English)
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"


[ˈbrɪtɪsɪzəm] N (US) → modismo m or vocablo m del inglés británico


nBritizismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
On several occasions, he uses Briticisms, once remarking that Will Hunting is "about that high" (instead of the more typically American expression of height: "about this tall").
Pearson claims, "leaving in Briticisms adds an unnecessary level of confusion and detracts from a story's universality.
The only exception came from the Wall Street Journal critic, who found the book full of awkward Briticisms and "devoid of personality.
This translation of Plato's Republic is a revision of the 1852 translation by John Llewelyn Davies and David James Vaughan, eliminating archaisms and Briticisms while preserving the original's style.