empiricism

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em·pir·i·cism

 (ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

(ɛmˈpɪrɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that all knowledge of matters of fact derives from experience and that the mind is not furnished with a set of concepts in advance of experience. Compare intuitionism, rationalism
2. the use of empirical methods
3. (Medicine) medical quackery; charlatanism
emˈpiricist n, adj

em•pir•i•cism

(ɛmˈpɪr əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. empirical method or practice.
2. the philosophic doctrine that all knowledge is derived from sense experience. Compare rationalism (def. 2).
3. undue reliance upon experience, as in medicine; quackery.
4. a conclusion that is arrived at empirically.
[1650–60]
em•pir′i•cist, n., adj.

empiricism

1. the doctrine that all ideas and categories are derived from sense experience and that knowledge cannot extend beyond experience, including observation, experiment, and induction.
2. an empirical method or practice. — empiricist, n.empirical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
a system of acquiring knowledge that rejects all o priori knowledge and relies solely upon observation, experimentation, and induction. Also empirism. — empiricist, n., adj. — empiric, empirical, adj.
See also: Knowledge

empiricism

The view that knowledge proceeds from experience.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.empiricism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge derives from experience
British empiricism - the predominant philosophical tradition in Great Britain since the 17th century
experimentalism - an empirical doctrine that advocates experimental principles
logical positivism, positivism - the form of empiricism that bases all knowledge on perceptual experience (not on intuition or revelation)
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.empiricism - the application of empirical methods in any art or science
investigating, investigation - the work of inquiring into something thoroughly and systematically
3.empiricism - medical practice and advice based on observation and experience in ignorance of scientific findings
medical practice - the practice of medicine
Translations

empiricism

[emˈpɪrɪsɪzəm] Nempirismo m

empiricism

[ɪmˈpɪrɪsɪzəm] nempirisme m

empiricism

nEmpirismus m; (method) → Empirie f

empiricism

[ɛmˈpɪrɪˌsɪzm] nempirismo
References in periodicals archive ?
If one starts with the Greeks rather than the British empiricists, one is likely to have an entirely different attitude toward the moral order.
We are dealing with relationships between sensations, or more precisely between what the early British empiricists like John Locke or David Hume called ideas; For them, anything in the mind is by definition an idea.
Laracy in "An Empirical Critique of Empiricism." The authors propose that a strict empiricism, put forward both by the modern British empiricists and by the ancient skeptics, should be set aside in favor of the "mitigated" or "metaphysical" empiricism represented by Aristotle and St.

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