British Union of Fascists


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

British Union of Fascists

n
(Historical Terms) the British fascist party founded by Sir Oswald Mosley (1932), which advocated a strong corporate state and promoted anti-Semitism
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
"Every time the British Union Of Fascists (BUF) tried to organise in Scotland - whether it was Glasgow, Edinburgh, Wishaw, Aberdeen, Motherwell or Wick - anti-fascists would oppose them.
Mitford first set eyes on Hitler at the 1933 Nuremberg Rally which she attended as part of a British Union of Fascists delegation.
Mussolini's fascist internationalism inspired imitators around the world, from Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists to Corneliu Zelea Codreanu's Iron Guard in Romania.
Oswald Mosley perfected it in the 1930s when he set up the New Party which eventually morphed into the British Union of Fascists. But this second form of anti-politics still assumes that voting makes a difference, that there are some politicians (the populists) who are deserving of the people's trust.
A demonstrator is arrested by police officers in the East End of London during the Battle of Cable Street, a clash between the Metropolitan Police, who were overseeing a march by members of the British Union of Fascists, and anti-fascist counter-protesters, including local Jewish, socialist, anarchist, Irish, and communist groups on October 4, 1936.
He does so here, focusing on Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists and Jewish responses to it.
UNLIKE Hitler, the British Union of Fascists did not have an army, navy and airforce ("The Threat We Faced from Fascists", Feedback, January 6).
Not only did she join the movement for political franchise, she also became a pioneer policewoman and, in her latter years, a misguided supporter of Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists. She loved dressing in uniforms, cut her hair like a man and formed liaisons with wealthy women who helped to fund her activities.
From a Jewish family, Lomon volunteered after clashing with British Union of Fascists supporters at the Battle of Cable Street in east London in 1936.
In the 1930s the leader of the British Union of Fascists, Oswald Mosely, was famously stopped in his tracks with his supporters by anti-fascists and the local community of Cable Street in Limehouse when the Blackshirts tried to march through the area.
He read and translated Lord Sydenham of Combe's The Jewish World Problem and became a disciple of Oswald Mosley, leader of the British Union of Fascists. He also maintained contact with other English-speaking fascists, notably in the United States.
The connections between the Italian Fascists and Nazis and various fascist parties in Europe in the inter-war era, such as the British Union of Fascists (BUF), have been investigated in studies such as Richard Thurlow, Fascism in Britain, A History, 1918-1945, London, 1989 and Martin Pugh, 'Hurrah for the Blackshirts': Fascists and Fascism in Britain Between the Wars, London, 2005.

Full browser ?