Britishism


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Brit·ish·ism

 (brĭt′ĭ-shĭz′əm)
n.
Variant of Briticism.

Britishism

(ˈbrɪtɪˌʃɪzəm)
n
a variant of Briticism

Brit•ish•ism

(ˈbrɪt ɪˌʃɪz əm)

n.
2. a custom, manner, or quality peculiar to or associated with the British people.
[1880–85]

Briticism, Britishism

a word or phrase characteristic of speakers of English in Britain and not usually used by English speakers elsewhere.
See also: English
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Britishism - an expression that is used in Great Britain (especially as contrasted with American English)
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"
2.Britishism - a custom that is peculiar to England or its citizens
custom, usage, usance - accepted or habitual practice
References in periodicals archive ?
Keith Mensforth, who provided the space for the carwash, said: "In reality all the yobs have done is burn down the room where Krosh and the lads had a cup of tea." Yob is a Britishism for rude, obnoxious, violent and stupid youths.
Golwalkar writes, 'The theories of territorial nationalism and common danger, which formed the basis of our concept of nation, had deprived us of the positive and inspiring content of our real Hindu nationhood...Anti Britishism was equated with patriotism and nationalism, this reactionary view had disastrous effects upon the entire course of freedom movement, its leaders and its people." (Bunch of thoughts Bangalore 1996, p.
And it did so simply by, to borrow a Britishism, taking the piss out of the industry--with an undeniable swagger that earned a place in some 600 media stories around America's breathless collective dash toward Super Bowl Sunday.
Deep down, "The World's End" feels by, about and for the sort of wry, semi-smart, semi-stupid, semi-adolescent blokes (to use a Britishism that perfectly captures the vibe) seen here, which might have alienated more femme viewers if Rosamund Pike weren't on hand to provide such a spunky, likable rooting interest as Sam, an object of affection for both Gary and Steven.
A Britishism for the tracksuit, trackies are just one staple in a slew of sportswear-inspired silhouettes that Green, Andersen and other likeminded designers are using as fodder for all sorts of experimentation, like the Versace-inspired prints of Kit Neale and Alex Mattsson, or the wonderfully garish designs of Nasir Mazhar, a Turkish-Cypriot from East London who grew up on a heavy diet of '90s R&B and whose fantastic collections of sports bras, crop tops and sweatpants are like an acid-trip interpretation of retro Nike classics.
The godawful Britishism gobsmacked, we can live with that.
* SIR - As we swim in an apparently unending tide of contrived "Britishism" might I ask two questions through the medium of thus column.
But then, we can even forgive the use of the Britishism "pub" in a passage like the following description of Tel Aviv: [I]n this whole happy, hedonistic city, with its pubs crowded every night, with its pretty radiant girls, with its strong, healthy youngsters, its rich, successful men who can get whatever they want, its theaters and concerts and exhibitions and intellectuals and journalists and soldiers and athletes--wherever I look, as if some evil spell has been cast upon me, always, at every turn, all I see is misery and old age and illness and filth.
Hanif's observations of the camp are precise and hair-raising, and one forgives the accidental Britishisms that pepper Major Ellie's speech (no American says "queue", "gap year", "rubbish", "bin", "tinned", "cookery" or "takeaway").
When quizzed on 'Britishisms' last year by TV Channel Dave, she only managed to get a measly four out of 15 questions about Britain right.
The wealth of British-produced shows on Netflix and Amazon Prime surely has given us greater opportunity to adopt Britishisms as our own.
Jim said, startled and over-loud, snatching up one of the Britishisms he used to keep life at bay.