Brittany


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Brit·ta·ny

 (brĭt′n-ē) also Bre·tagne (brə-tän′yə)
A historical region and former province of northwest France on a peninsula between the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay. It was settled c. 500 by Britons driven out of their homeland by the Anglo-Saxons. The region was formally incorporated into France in 1532.

Brittany

(ˈbrɪtənɪ)
n
(Placename) a region of NW France, the peninsula between the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay: settled by Celtic refugees from Wales and Cornwall during the Anglo-Saxon invasions; disputed between England and France until 1364. Breton name: Breiz French name: Bretagne

Brittany

n, pl -nies
(Breeds) a medium-sized strongly-built variety of retriever with a slightly wavy coat usually in tan and white, liver and white, or black and white

Brit•ta•ny

(ˈbrɪt n i)

n.
1. a historic region in NW France, on a peninsula between the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay: a former duchy and province.
2. a metropolitan region in NW France. 2,796,000; 10,505 sq. mi. (27,208 sq. km).
French, Bretagne.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brittany - a former province of northwestern France on a peninsula between the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Breton - a native or inhabitant of Brittany (especially one who speaks the Breton language)
Translations
Bretagne
Bretagne
Bretagne
Bretagne

Brittany

[ˈbrɪtənɪ] NBretaña f

Brittany

[ˈbrɪtəni] nBretagne f
in Brittany → en Bretagne
to Brittany → en Bretagne
she's from Brittany → elle est bretonne

Brittany

ndie Bretagne

Brittany

[ˈbrɪtənɪ] nBretagna
References in classic literature ?
Later, when the Romans left our island and the Picts and Scots oppressed the Britons, many of them fled back over the sea to Brittany or Armorica, as it used to be called.
When they are, it is easier to hold them, especially when they have not been accustomed to self- government; and to hold them securely it is enough to have destroyed the family of the prince who was ruling them; because the two peoples, preserving in other things the old conditions, and not being unlike in customs, will live quietly together, as one has seen in Brittany, Burgundy, Gascony, and Normandy, which have been bound to France for so long a time: and, although there may be some difference in language, nevertheless the customs are alike, and the people will easily be able to get on amongst themselves.
My thoughts wandered, and I thought of the sunny beaches of Brittany and the freshness of the sea.
Those in whom the faculty of reason is predominant, and who most skillfully dispose their thoughts with a view to render them clear and intelligible, are always the best able to persuade others of the truth of what they lay down, though they should speak only in the language of Lower Brittany, and be wholly ignorant of the rules of rhetoric; and those whose minds are stored with the most agreeable fancies, and who can give expression to them with the greatest embellishment and harmony, are still the best poets, though unacquainted with the art of poetry.
These cavaliers conducted me, in great haste, to the little port of Tenby, threw me, rather than embarked me, into a fishing-boat, about to sail for Brittany, and here I am.
The missionary was a poor young man from the village of Aradon, in Brittany, in the Morbihan country.
In Brittany he had come across a painter whom nobody else had heard of, a queer fellow who had been a stockbroker and taken up painting at middle-age, and he was greatly influenced by his work.
He spent a dismal day in town and did not recover his spirits until the evening, when he was seated in his compartment in the Brittany express.
Tourists in Normandy, Brittany, Maine, and Anjou must all have seen in the capitals of those provinces many houses which resemble more or less that of the Cormons; for it is, in its way, an archetype of the burgher houses in that region of France, and it deserves a place in this history because it serves to explain manners and customs, and represents ideas.
Then I must make a journey to see my family, in the lower part of Brittany, to obtain the sum necessary for my departure.
Abelard returned secretly and carried Heloise away to Palais, in Brittany, his native country.
After a time it became known that Totski had married a French marquise, and was to be carried off by her to Paris, and then to Brittany.