broad-leaved

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broad-leaved

(brôd′lēvd′) also broad-leafed (-lēft′)
adj.
Having broad or relatively broad leaves rather than needlelike or scalelike leaves.

broad-leaved

adj
(Botany) denoting trees other than conifers, most of which have broad rather than needle-shaped leaves

broad′-leaved`

or broadleaf



adj.
of or pertaining to plants having broad leaves rather than needles.
[1545–55]

broad-leaved

(brôd′lēvd′) also broad-leafed (brôd′lēft′)
Having broad leaves rather than needle-like or scale-like leaves. Azaleas, rhododendrons, and hollies are broad-leaved evergreens.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.broad-leaved - having relatively broad rather than needlelike or scalelike leaves
deciduous - (of plants and shrubs) shedding foliage at the end of the growing season
References in periodicals archive ?
This is an evergreen broad-leaved tree whose every part is useful and has medicinal properties.
Mr Browne confirmed that the Welsh Government's massive tree-planting programme in which nearly 250,000 acres (100,000ha) of trees will be planted over the next 20 years will no longer include ash - hitherto a very important component as a native broad-leaved tree ?
robur reaches 400 years of age, occurs mostly in mixed woods with other broad-leaved tree species, and coarse dead wood amounts are mostly over 100 m3 ha-1 (Falinski, 1988; Bobiec, 2002).
In Book XV, 11, he asks further: 'Why is it that an eclipse of the sun, if one looks at it through a sieve or through leaves, such as a plane-tree or other broad-leaved tree, or if one joins the fingers of one hand over the fingers of the other, the rays are crescent-shaped where they reach the earth?
There is a differentiation, however, parallel to that of Japan, between the southern zone, corresponding approximately to the deciduous forests of the temperate climates of the center of Japan, and the northern zone, equivalent to the deciduous broad-leaved tree forests of the cold temperate climate of northern Japan, neighboring Manchuria, and the west of Europe that have a predominance of beeches, although with local nuances.
For a broad-leaved tree, it's a monster, with a girth that spans 42 feet.
As a general rule, the sideways spread of a broad-leaved tree grown in open conditions is 40% of its ultimate height.
More than 6,000 decares of coniferous and broad-leaved trees have been destroyed by the fire.
Thus, conifer plantations and natural forests of broad-leaved trees form a complex mosaic landscape.
The vegetation consists, typically, of a ground cover of grasses of varying heights interspersed with fire resistant, deciduous, broad-leaved trees at the forest margins along the river Banks.
Even though some broad-leaved trees hold their foliage all year, evergreens are for most gardeners synonymous with conifers, numbering around 600 separate species, the oldest of which, Ginko biloba, can be found in 200 million-year-old fossil records.