broadside

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broad·side

 (brôd′sīd′)
n.
1. The side of a ship above the water line.
2.
a. All the guns on one side of a warship.
b. The simultaneous discharge of these guns.
3. A forceful verbal attack, as in a speech or editorial.
4.
a. A large sheet of paper usually printed on one side.
b. Something, such as an advertisement or public notice, that is printed on a broadside. Also called broadsheet.
5. A broad, unbroken surface.
adv.
With the side turned to a given point or object; sideways: The wave hit the canoe broadside and sank it.
tr.v. broad·sid·ed, broad·sid·ing, broad·sides
To strike or collide with full on the side: lost control of the truck and broadsided the car.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

broadside

(ˈbrɔːdˌsaɪd)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical the entire side of a vessel, from stem to stern and from waterline to rail
2. (Military) navy
a. all the armament fired from one side of a warship
b. the simultaneous discharge of such armament
3. (Rhetoric) a strong or abusive verbal or written attack
4. (Music, other) Also called: broadside ballad a ballad or popular song printed on one side of a sheet of paper and sold by hawkers, esp in 16th-century England
5. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) any standard size of paper before cutting or folding: demy broadside.
6. (Journalism & Publishing) another name for broadsheet1
7. a large flat surface: the broadside of the barn.
adv
with a broader side facing an object; sideways: the train hit the lorry broadside.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

broad•side

(ˈbrɔdˌsaɪd)

n., adv., v. -sid•ed, -sid•ing. n.
1. the whole side of a ship above the water line.
2.
a. all the guns that can be fired from one side of a warship.
b. a simultaneous discharge of all such guns.
3. any strong or comprehensive attack, as by criticism.
4. Also called broad•sheet (ˈbrɔdˌʃit)
a. a sheet of paper printed, orig. on one side only, as for distribution or posting.
b. any printed advertising circular.
5. a broad surface or side, as of a house.
6. Also called broad′side bal′lad. a song, esp. in 16th- and 17th-century England, written on a topical subject and printed on broadsides.
adv.
7. with the side facing toward a given point or object.
8. at random: to attack the policies broadside.
v.i.
9. to proceed or go broadside.
10. to fire a broadside.
v.t.
11. to run into the side of.
12. to make verbal attacks on.
[1565–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.broadside - an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distributionbroadside - an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distribution; "he mailed the circular to all subscribers"
ad, advert, advertisement, advertising, advertizement, advertizing - a public promotion of some product or service
stuffer - an advertising circular that is enclosed with other material and (usually) sent by mail
2.broadside - a speech of violent denunciationbroadside - a speech of violent denunciation  
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
declamation - vehement oratory
3.broadside - all of the armament that is fired from one side of a warship
armament - weaponry used by military or naval force
naval forces, navy - an organization of military vessels belonging to a country and available for sea warfare
4.broadside - the whole side of a vessel from stem to stern; "the ship was broadside to the dock"
side - an extended outer surface of an object; "he turned the box over to examine the bottom side"; "they painted all four sides of the house"
5.broadside - the simultaneous firing of all the armament on one side of a warship
firing, fire - the act of firing weapons or artillery at an enemy; "hold your fire until you can see the whites of their eyes"; "they retreated in the face of withering enemy fire"
naval forces, navy - an organization of military vessels belonging to a country and available for sea warfare
Verb1.broadside - collide with the broad side of; "her car broad-sided mine"
collide with, impinge on, hit, run into, strike - hit against; come into sudden contact with; "The car hit a tree"; "He struck the table with his elbow"
Adj.1.broadside - toward a full side; "a broadside attack"
side - located on a side; "side fences"; "the side porch"
Adv.1.broadside - with a side facing an object; "the train hit the truck broadside"; "the wave caught the canoe broadside and capsized it"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

broadside

noun attack, criticism, censure, swipe, denunciation, diatribe, sideswipe, philippic She defiantly replied with a broadside.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
z bokuzboku

broadside

[ˈbrɔːdsaɪd]
A. N (Naut) (= side) → costado m; (= shots) (also fig) → andanada f
to fire a broadside (lit, fig) → soltar or disparar una andanada
broadside on (as adv) → de costado
B. ADV to be moored broadside to sthestar amarrado de costado a algo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

broadside

[ˈbrɔːdsaɪd] n
(= attack) → attaque f violente or virulente
to launch a broadside against sb/sth → lancer une attaque violente contre qn/qch
broadside on advpar le travers
to be broadside to sth → être flanc à flanc avec qchbroad-spectrum [ˌbrɔːdˈspɛktrəm] adj [antibiotic, vaccine, herbicide, pesticide] → à large spectre
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

broadside

[ˈbrɔːdsaɪd] n (Naut) → bordata (fig) → attacco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The programme includes: Monday, July 8: Pirates Arr; Wednesday, July 10: Burns animal mascot making; Monday, July 15: Super Storytelling with Tom Tell Tales; Wednesday, July 17: Discovering herbs; Monday, July 22: Make a Roman standard; Wednesday, July 24: Creepy crawlies; Monday, July 29: Silhouette portraits; Wednesday, July 31: Make a garden bird mobile; Monday, August 5: Meet some pilgrims and make a pilgrim badge; Wednesday, August 7: Windows on Burns; Monday, August 12: Print a broadside ballad; Wednesday, August 14: Super scarecrow making.
(1) The Early Broadside Ballad Archive (UC Santa Barbara) and Broadside Ballads Online (Oxford) have done much to catalogue extant ballads from the period, and the Arden Early Modern Drama series now offers a treble clef as a musical marker to indicate the punctuation of a scene or act by music.
More generally, Caralyn Bialo, "Popular Performance, the Broadside Ballad, and Ophelia's Madness," SEL 53, no.
This is the "broadside ballad" tradition associated in particular with larger towns and cities, where urban populations sang, printed, sold, and purchased songs, and pasted them to walls.
Instances involving the New World include Purcell's The Indian Queen, a broadside ballad from ca.
Another example: 'The broadside ballad's heyday (1550s to the 1690s) roughly corresponds with the height of the English witch craze' (p.
Two economically focused poems, Richard Barnfield's "The Encomium of Lady Pecunia: Or, the Praise of Money" (1598) and the anonymous broadside ballad "Rare News for the Female Sex: Or, Good Luck at Last" (1695/6), offer us the opportunity to consider representations of high cultural and popular cultural debates about monetary reform at either end of the seventeenth century and to evaluate them for their contribution to a fuller picture of economic thought in the period, as well as a better sense of how thoroughly economic thinking had penetrated the culture.
This volume serves as a companion to the online English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA) and is a guide to the ballad collection of diarist Samuel Pepys (1633-1703) (the Pepys Ballad Archive (PBA) includes more than 1,800 broadside ballads).
Rather, in putting new lyrical wine into old musical bottles, he was simply following in the well-worn footsteps of the broadside ballad, the culturally vital tradition from which John Gay created the ballad opera.
In her first, most innovative chapter, "Murder, Execution, and the Criminal Classes," she turns to working-class street poetry, specifically the execution ballad, and contends that while individual ballads are deeply connected to their particular moment--the criminal, trial, or sentence in question, a definite change in the criminal law--formal requirements of the genre, such as the "astonished" reaction of gathered spectators or the condemned's last words, lend the broadside ballad a certain consistency during the nineteenth century that contrasts changing definitions of criminality itself and consequent modifications in punishment.
* La Broadside Ballad [complainte traditionnelle imprimee] constitue une des formes les plus anciennes de culture populaire en Europe et en Amerique.
Tomorrow at the same time Dr Vic Gammon will give a lecture, Oral Tradition and the Broadside Ballad, at the King's Hall, Armstrong Building, Newcastle University.