broch

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broch

(brɒk; brɒx)
n
(Fortifications) (in Scotland) a circular dry-stone tower large enough to serve as a fortified home; they date from the Iron Age and are found esp in the north and the islands
[C17: from Old Norse borg; related to Old English burh settlement, burgh]

broch

A circular, drystone Iron Age tower containing living quarters, common in the north of Scotland and thought to have been used as a fortified home.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brochs and the Roman occupation of low-land Scotland, Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 114: 234-49.
Excavations at Kilpheder, South Uist, and the problem of the brochs and wheel-houses, Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 18: 176-93.
Notice of nine brochs along the Caithness coast from Keiss Bay to Skirza Head, excavated by Sir Francis Tress Barry, Bart, MP, of Keiss Castle, Caithness, Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 35 (1900-1): 112-48.
Pins and the chronology of brochs, Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 21: 282-94.
The Edinburgh University project targeted the excavation of Iron Age settlements because of the presence of visible monuments, brochs and wheelhouses, that have been subject to detailed investigation over the last century.
Radiocarbon dates show that these have been built since the early iron age through to the late 1st millennium AD, and form a coherent area of distinctive settlement type in Argyll in contrast to the brochs, enclosures and forts of other areas of Scotland (Henderson 2000: figure 1).
Bronze and Iron Age folk followed them and the ruins of their fortified towers, the brochs, still line the banks of the River Naver and zigzag from the estuary to source.
Theorie und Geschichte (2013) and Beobachtungen der Moderne in Hermann Brochs Die Schlafwandler und Robert Musils Der Mann ohne Eigenschaften.
Brochs are tall, circular towers unique to Scotland, generally surrounded by sizeable villages.
For thousands of years dry stone walls and structures have been put up: from the buildings of Newgrange in Ireland, the brochs of the Celts, as well as Egypt, Japan and South America to the turf walls of Iceland.
Most of the brochs on these islands are visible to each other, making them perfect communication towers as well as somewhere to live.
MOUSA, SHETLAND The mother of all Iron Age brochs - fortress towers - stands on an island off the east coast of the Shetland mainland' 2.