brock

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brock

 (brŏk)
n. Chiefly British
A badger.

[Middle English brok, from Old English broc, of Celtic origin.]

brock

(brɒk)
n
a Brit name, used esp as a form of address in stories, for badger1
[Old English broc, of Celtic origin; compare Welsh broch]

brock

(brɒk)

n.
a European badger.
[before 1000; Middle English brok, Old English broc badger < Celtic; compare Irish, Scottish Gaelic broc, Welsh broch]
Translations

brock

[brɒk] N (Brit) (liter) → tejón m
References in periodicals archive ?
Comments Brockes, "The retinoids are likely to have a variety of unsuspected roles in development and adult physiology.
The 72-year-old De Niro was interviewed by New York-based writer Emma Brockes for the Radio Times while promoting his new movie The Intern, but cut the chat short, claiming her questions had a "negative inference".
JS Wright, which has its head office in Aston, has strengthened its project management team with the appointment of Tim Brockes.
As Emma Brockes recently put it, "Woody Allen has been playing himself for so many years now that one wonders if his personality might, at some stage, actually run out" (9).
The Passion of Christ is an adaptation of Handel's 1716 Brockes Passion.
17, 2008 (Magazine), at 26; see also, Emma Brockes, He Told Us So, GUARDIAN (London), Jan.
Jeremy Brockes of University College London says that, like an orchestra playing different tunes, the key instruments are the same but they are being directed in different ways.
While Telegraph reviewer Claire Prentice said the cast had the audience "enthralled", Emma Brockes, writing in The Guardian was savage.
Adams and Hicks, both freelance journalists, interview successful journalists such as Emma Brockes and Andrew Duncan to gather advice on handling different types of interview subjects and carrying out interviews on the phone or through email.
In an interview with Guardian reporter Emma Brockes, conducted shortly after Ms Theron won an Academy Award for her portrayal of serial killer Aileen Wuornos, she confesses, for instance, that her nationality was a source of deep embarrassment when she first moved to the United States.
She recounts how Jane Fonda once remarked that "patriarchy is very much alive and well, and we have to do something about it," and her interviewer Emma Brockes replied that patriarchy is an "anachronism" and that "lots of women would bridle at the suggestion they are victims of a patriarchal system.