Broglie


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Related to Broglie: Schrodinger

Broglie

(brɔj)
n
(Biography) See de Broglie1

Bro•glie

(brɔɪ, broʊgˈli, broʊlˈyeɪ)
n.
Louis Victor de. de Broglie, Louis Victor.
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Noun1.Broglie - French nuclear physicist who generalized the wave-particle duality by proposing that particles of matter exhibit wavelike properties (1892-1987)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the early part of the twentieth century when it was realized that the massless photon had particle-like properties, de Broglie figured therefor that the massive electron must have wave-like properties-- and the de Broglie matter wave was born [1, p.55].
Louis de Broglie posited the idea then dropped it, but David Bohm picked it up during the 1950s, dusted it off, and showed that Bohmian (not Broglian!) mechanics agrees with all quantum experiments done up to now.
They explain the contributions of physicists such as Planck, Einstein, Heisenberg, de Broglie, Schrodinger, and Born.
Winehouse's face has been put on French artist Ingres's 1853 work Princess Albert de Broglie.
These include Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Louie de Broglie, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrodinger.
Three years earlier, de Broglie had suggested that particles such as electrons might have wave aspects (see 1923).
Address : 19 Rue Louis De Broglie - Bp 56507 21065 Dijon Cedex F
As discussed in [13], the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle arises because x and p form a Fourier transform pair of variables at the quantum level due to the momentum p of a quantum particle being proportional to the de Broglie wave number k of the particle.
He sets out the principles of photonics, stressing the four key scientific concepts of the Boltzmann relationship, the Planck equation relating energy to frequency, the de Broglie relationship equating momentum to wavelength, and the conservation of energy and momentum.
De Broglie suggested that electrons and indeed all particles had wave aspects (see 1923).
The wavelenth of an atom, known as its de Broglie wavelenth, is based on its momentum and can be 10,000 times shorter than that of visible light.