bromide

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bro·mide

 (brō′mīd′)
n.
1.
a. Univalent anionic bromine, or a compound of bromine, especially a binary compound of bromine with a more electropositive element.
b. Potassium bromide.
2.
a. A commonplace remark or notion; a platitude. See Synonyms at cliché.
b. A tiresome person; a bore.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bromide

(ˈbrəʊmaɪd)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) any salt of hydrobromic acid, containing the monovalent ion Br (bromide ion)
2. (Elements & Compounds) any compound containing a bromine atom, such as methyl bromide
3. (Medicine) a dose of sodium or potassium bromide given as a sedative
4.
a. a trite saying; platitude
b. a dull or boring person
[C19, C20 (cliché): from brom(ine) + -ide]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bro•mide

(ˈbroʊ maɪd or, for 1, ˈbroʊ mɪd)

n.
1.
a. a salt of hydrobromic acid consisting of bromine and another element.
b. a compound containing bromine, as methyl bromide.
2. potassium bromide, formerly used as a sedative.
3. a trite saying; platitude.
4. a boring, platitudinous person.
[1830–40; brom (ine) + -ide; (definitions 3,4) from use of some bromides as sedatives]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bro·mide

(brō′mīd′)
A compound, such as potassium bromide, containing bromine and another element or radical.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bromide

a trite saying; a platitude.
See also: Proverbs
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bromide - any of the salts of hydrobromic acid; formerly used as a sedative but now generally replaced by safer drugs
halide - a salt of any halogen acid
hydrogen bromide - a colorless gas that yields hydrobromic acid in solution with water
methyl bromide - a poisonous gas or liquid (CH3Br) used to fumigate rodents, worms, etc.
silver bromide - a bromide that darkens when exposed to light; used in making photographic emulsions
2.bromide - a trite or obvious remark
comment, remark, input - a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
truism - an obvious truth
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

bromide

noun platitude, cliché, banality, truism, commonplace, chestnut (informal), old saw, trite remark, hackneyed saying or phrase The same old bromides were used to justify failure.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

bromide

noun
A trite expression or idea:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
brómbromidsuchar
bromiditylsimys
bromek
bromid

bromide

[ˈbrəʊmaɪd] N
1. (Chem, Typ) → bromuro m
2. (fig) (= platitude) → perogrullada f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bromide

[ˈbrəʊmaɪd] n
(= drug) → bromure m
(= platitude) → banalité f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bromide

n
(Chem) → Bromid nt; (Typ) → Bromsilberdruck m; (Med inf) → Beruhigungsmittel nt
(fig, = platitude) → Plattitüde f, → Allgemeinplatz m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bromide

[ˈbrəʊmaɪd] n (Chem) → bromuro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

bro·mide

n. bromuro, bromo, elemento no metálico, miembro del grupo de halógenos, muy irritante a las membranas mucosas. Se emplea como oxidante y antiséptico.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bromide

n bromuro
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
of chloride of sodium; then, in a smaller quantity, chlorides of magnesium and of potassium, bromide of magnesium, sulphate of magnesia, sulphate and carbonate of lime.
Why, he is no more than a ponderous bromide, thanks to Gelett Burgess.
She was so used to hearing Sellers lash the Philistine and hold forth on unappreciated merit that she could hardly believe the miracle when, in answer to a sympathetic bromide on the popular lack of taste in Art, Beverley replied that, as far as he was concerned, the public showed strong good sense.
Prepared Ag NPs electrocatalysts were tested for detection of bromides, chlorides, and iodides using cyclic voltammetry.
Sensing of Bromides. Subsequently, possibility of using prepared Ag and Ag/C catalysts for electroanalytical sensing of bromides was examined.
"Zinc bromide and other bromides are highly corrosive to any form of steel it comes into contact with," says consultant Downs.
Overindulgence in certain soft drinks may result in bromoderma, a skin condition caused by the consumption of bromides.
Bromides actually do have sedative properties so their use was not nonsensical.
California has banned bromides beginning in 2008, and Massachusetts has held a hearing on the matter.
As the data shows (Figure 1), samples with the lowest levels of bromide passed Hook testing.