stickleback

(redirected from Brook stickleback)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

stick·le·back

 (stĭk′əl-băk′)
n.
Any of various small freshwater and marine fishes of the family Gasterosteidae, having erectile spines along the back.

[Middle English stikelbak : Old English sticel, prick; see steig- in Indo-European roots + Middle English bak, back; see back1.]

stickleback

(ˈstɪkəlˌbæk)
n
(Animals) any small teleost fish of the family Gasterosteidae, such as Gasterosteus aculeatus (three-spined stickleback) of rivers and coastal regions and G. pungitius (ten-spined stickleback) confined to rivers. They have a series of spines along the back and occur in cold and temperate northern regions
[C15: from Old English stickel prick, sting + back1]

stick•le•back

(ˈstɪk əlˌbæk)

n.
any of the small, pugnacious, spiny-backed fish of the family Gasterosteidae, inhabiting northern fresh waters and sea inlets.
[1400–50; late Middle English stykylbak= Old English sticels goad, thorn (c. Old High German stihhil goad, Old Norse stikill point of a horn) + bæc back1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stickleback - small (2-4 inches) pugnacious mostly scaleless spiny-backed fishes of northern fresh and littoral waters having elaborate courtshipstickleback - small (2-4 inches) pugnacious mostly scaleless spiny-backed fishes of northern fresh and littoral waters having elaborate courtship; subjects of much research
Gasterosteus aculeatus, three-spined stickleback - of rivers and coastal regions
acanthopterygian, spiny-finned fish - a teleost fish with fins that are supported by sharp inflexible rays
Translations

stickleback

[ˈstɪklbæk] Nespinoso m

stickleback

[ˈstɪkəlbæk] népinoche f

stickleback

nStichling m

stickleback

[ˈstɪklˌbæk] nspinarello
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased dorsal spine number in threespine stickleback has been associated with avian predation (Reimchen, 1980; Reimchen and Nosil, 2002), whereas a decreased number of spines has been associated with Odonate naiad predation in both threespine stickleback (Reimchen and Nosil, 2002) and brook stickleback (Culaea inconstant Reist, 1980).
Predation upon pelvic phenotypes of brook stickleback, Culaea inconstans, by selected invertebrates.
Cluster analyses based on fish abundance at sites classified according to succession al environment indicated that four species (northern redbelly dace, Phoxinus eos; brook stickleback, Culaea inconstans; finescale dace, P.
Four species (redbelly dace, brook stickleback, fat-head minnow, and finescale dace) were predominant in all successional environments, so that variation in species composition among environments was due to the addition of less abundant species (Table 2).
Geographic variation in the brook stickleback, Culaea inconstans, and notes on nomenclature and distribution.
A comparison of startle response in two morphs of the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans): further evidence for a trade-off between defensive morphology and swimming ability.
Evidence for a tradeoff between defensive morphology and startle-response performance in the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans).
Schlosser, personal observation and unpublished data) included the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans), brassy minnow (Hybognathus hankinsoni), northern redbelly dace (Phoxinus eos), finescale dace (Phoxinus neogaeus), fathead minnow, creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus), blackchin shiner (Notropis heterodon), and pump-kinseed sunfish.
The brook stickleback Culaea inconstans is an intriguing species with which to begin building such a database because the specific designation "inconstans" means "changeable" in Latin; the term was initially chosen by Kirtland (1840) to reflect morphological variability in the frequency of dorsal spines (Nelson, 1969; reviewed in Mattern, 2006b).
30) include bigmouth shiner and plains killifish (Fundulus kansae) for the first axis; creek chub, longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) and white sucker for the second axis; brook stickleback (Culea inconstans), central stoneroller (Campostoma anomalum), creek chub and plains killifish for the third axis; and fathead minnow, longnose dace and white sucker for the fourth axis (Table 2).