stickleback

(redirected from Brook stickleback)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

stick·le·back

 (stĭk′əl-băk′)
n.
Any of various small freshwater and marine fishes of the family Gasterosteidae, having erectile spines along the back.

[Middle English stikelbak : Old English sticel, prick; see steig- in Indo-European roots + Middle English bak, back; see back1.]

stickleback

(ˈstɪkəlˌbæk)
n
(Animals) any small teleost fish of the family Gasterosteidae, such as Gasterosteus aculeatus (three-spined stickleback) of rivers and coastal regions and G. pungitius (ten-spined stickleback) confined to rivers. They have a series of spines along the back and occur in cold and temperate northern regions
[C15: from Old English stickel prick, sting + back1]

stick•le•back

(ˈstɪk əlˌbæk)

n.
any of the small, pugnacious, spiny-backed fish of the family Gasterosteidae, inhabiting northern fresh waters and sea inlets.
[1400–50; late Middle English stykylbak= Old English sticels goad, thorn (c. Old High German stihhil goad, Old Norse stikill point of a horn) + bæc back1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stickleback - small (2-4 inches) pugnacious mostly scaleless spiny-backed fishes of northern fresh and littoral waters having elaborate courtshipstickleback - small (2-4 inches) pugnacious mostly scaleless spiny-backed fishes of northern fresh and littoral waters having elaborate courtship; subjects of much research
Gasterosteus aculeatus, three-spined stickleback - of rivers and coastal regions
acanthopterygian, spiny-finned fish - a teleost fish with fins that are supported by sharp inflexible rays
Translations

stickleback

[ˈstɪklbæk] Nespinoso m

stickleback

[ˈstɪkəlbæk] népinoche f

stickleback

nStichling m

stickleback

[ˈstɪklˌbæk] nspinarello
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased dorsal spine number in threespine stickleback has been associated with avian predation (Reimchen, 1980; Reimchen and Nosil, 2002), whereas a decreased number of spines has been associated with Odonate naiad predation in both threespine stickleback (Reimchen and Nosil, 2002) and brook stickleback (Culaea inconstant Reist, 1980).
Male mate choice based on female nuptial coloration in the brook stickleback, Culaea inconstans (Kirtland).
(2) 272 0.844 0.644 (black and golden redhorse) Ictaluridae Ameurus melas (black bullhead) 1 0.003 0.005 Salmonidae Salmo trutta (brown trout) 4 0.012 0.059 Gasterosteidae Culaea inconstans 11 0.034 0.042 (brook stickleback) Cottidae Cottus bairdii (mottled sculpin) 778 2.413 2.479 Centrarchidae Ambloplites rupestris 52 0.161 0.166 (rock bass) Lepomis spp.
Four species (redbelly dace, brook stickleback, fat-head minnow, and finescale dace) were predominant in all successional environments, so that variation in species composition among environments was due to the addition of less abundant species (Table 2).
Previous studies suggest the four predominant species occurring in ponds (redbelly dace, finescale dace, fathead minnows, and brook stickleback) are all tolerant of oxygen stress (Cooper and Washburn 1946, Gee et al.
Geographic variation in the brook stickleback, Culaea inconstans, and notes on nomenclature and distribution.
A comparison of startle response in two morphs of the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans): further evidence for a trade-off between defensive morphology and swimming ability.
Evidence for a tradeoff between defensive morphology and startle-response performance in the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans).
The native range of the Brook Stickleback, Culaea inconstans (Kirtland) includes most of the southern half of Canada and the northern part of the eastern United States, extending southward to the Great Lakes-Mississippi River basins to Colorado, Nebraska, Illinois, Ohio and Pennsylvania (Woodling, 1985; Lee and Gilbert, 1978; Page and Burr, 1981).
Several other species, including the brook stickleback, pumpkinseed sunfish, creek chub, and yellow perch exhibited relatively low abundances in 1983-1987 but increased abundances in 1988-1992 [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3 OMITTED].
The brook stickleback Culaea inconstans is an intriguing species with which to begin building such a database because the specific designation "inconstans" means "changeable" in Latin; the term was initially chosen by Kirtland (1840) to reflect morphological variability in the frequency of dorsal spines (Nelson, 1969; reviewed in Mattern, 2006b).
Fish species with high loadings (absolute value greater than 0.30) include bigmouth shiner and plains killifish (Fundulus kansae) for the first axis; creek chub, longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) and white sucker for the second axis; brook stickleback (Culea inconstans), central stoneroller (Campostoma anomalum), creek chub and plains killifish for the third axis; and fathead minnow, longnose dace and white sucker for the fourth axis (Table 2).