Brooke


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Brooke

 (bro͝ok), Rupert Chawner 1887-1915.
British poet known for his war poetry suffused with a romantic patriotic quality.

Brooke

(brʊk)
n
1. (Biography) Alan Francis. See Alanbrooke
2. (Biography) Sir James. 1803–68, British soldier; first rajah of Sarawak (1841–63)
3. (Biography) Rupert (Chawner). 1887–1915, British lyric poet, noted for his idealistic war poetry, which made him a national hero

Brooke

(brʊk)

n.
Rupert, 1887–1915, English poet.
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Noun1.Brooke - English lyric poet (1887-1915)
References in classic literature ?
You just will see a match; and Brooke's going to let me play in quarters.
They're going to try, at any rate, and won't make such a bad fight of it either, mark my word; for hasn't old Brooke won the toss, with his lucky halfpenny, and got choice of goals and kick-off?
Old Brooke takes half a dozen quick steps, and away goes the ball spinning towards the School goal, seventy yards before it touches ground, and at no point above twelve or fifteen feet high, a model kick-off; and the School-house cheer and rush on.
"Look out in quarters," Brooke's and twenty other voices ring out.
Miss Brooke had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress.
Brooke's conclusions were as difficult to predict as the weather: it was only safe to say that he would act with benevolent intentions, and that he would spend as little money as possible in carrying them out.
Brooke the hereditary strain of Puritan energy was clearly in abeyance; but in his niece Dorothea it glowed alike through faults and virtues, turning sometimes into impatience of her uncle's talk or his way of "letting things be" on his estate, and making her long all the more for the time when she would be of age and have some command of money for generous schemes.
The rural opinion about the new young ladies, even among the cottagers, was generally in favor of Celia, as being so amiable and innocent-looking, while Miss Brooke's large eyes seemed, like her religion, too unusual and striking.
Brooke will go to keep us boys steady, and Kate Vaughn will play propriety for the girls.
Brooke and Ned the other, while Fred Vaughn, the riotous twin, did his best to upset both by paddling about in a wherry like a disturbed water bug.
Brooke was a grave, silent young man, with handsome brown eyes and a pleasant voice.
"Brooke is commander in chief, I am commissary general, the other fellows are staff officers, and you, ladies, are company.