Brooks


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

brook 1

 (bro͝ok)
n. Chiefly Northeastern US
See creek. See Note at run.

[Middle English, from Old English brōc.]

brook 2

 (bro͝ok)
tr.v. brooked, brook·ing, brooks
To put up with; tolerate: We will brook no further argument.

[Middle English brouken, from Old English brūcan, to use, enjoy.]

Brooks

 (bro͝oks), Gwendolyn Elizabeth 1917-2000.
American poet known for her verse detailing the dreams and struggles of African Americans. An early volume of poems, Annie Allen (1949), was awarded a Pulitzer Prize.

Brooks

, Mel Born 1926.
American director, actor, and writer noted for the broad humor of his film comedies such as The Producers (1968), which he adapted for Broadway in 2001.

Brooks

, Van Wyck 1886-1963.
American literary historian, critic, and translator who wrote many books on the literary history of America, including The Flowering of New England (1936), for which he won a Pulitzer Prize.

Brooks

(brʊks)
n
1. (Biography) Geraldine. born 1955, Australian writer. Her novels include March (2005), which won the Pulitzer prize
2. (Biography) Mel, real name Melvyn Kaminsky. born 1926, US comedy writer, actor, and film director. His films include The Producers (1968), Blazing Saddles (1974), High Anxiety (1977), and Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1996)
3. (Biography) (Troyal) Garth. born 1962, US country singer and songwriter; his bestselling records include Ropin' the Wind (1991) and Scarecrow (2001)

Brooks

(brʊks)

n.
1. Gwendolyn, 1917–2000, U.S. poet and novelist.
2. Phillips, 1835–93, U.S. Protestant Episcopal bishop and orator.
3. Van Wyck (waɪk) 1886–1963, U.S. author and critic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brooks - United States literary critic and historian (1886-1963)
References in classic literature ?
Mrs Brooks, the lady who was the householder at The Herons, and owner of all the handsome furniture, was not a person of an unusually curious turn of mind.
The yellow trees were mirrored in the placid stream, with now and then a leaf falling on the water, mayhap to drift away and be used, as Uncle Blair suggested, by some adventurous wood sprite who had it in mind to fare forth to some far-off, legendary region where all the brooks ran into the sea.
Another of his sources of fearful pleasure was to pass long winter evenings with the old Dutch wives, as they sat spinning by the fire, with a row of apples roasting and spluttering along the hearth, and listen to their marvellous tales of ghosts and goblins, and haunted fields, and haunted brooks, and haunted bridges, and haunted houses, and particularly of the headless horseman, or Galloping Hessian of the Hollow, as they sometimes called him.
Rachel was sitting at her window, keeping a sharp eye on everything that passed, from brooks and children up, and that if she noticed anything odd or out of place she would never rest until she had ferreted out the whys and wherefores thereof.
But when within thy wave she looks - Which glistens then, and trembles - Why, then, the prettiest of brooks Her worshipper resembles; For in my heart, as in thy stream, Her image deeply lies - His heart which trembles at the beam Of her soul-searching eyes.
I was quite relieved to find that it was only Brooks of Sheffield; for, at first, I really thought it was I.
Here they sat down on a luxuriant heap of moss; which at some epoch of the preceding century, had been a gigantic pine, with its roots and trunk in the darksome shade, and its head aloft in the upper atmosphere It was a little dell where they had seated themselves, with a leaf-strewn bank rising gently on either side, and a brook flowing through the midst, over a bed of fallen and drowned leaves.
It would have been all over with her, likewise, if, by good fortune, a tailor who was travelling in search of work, had not sat down to rest by the brook.
Now I can go with you," said she, "but see, I can no longer step from the bank to yonder stone, for the brook seems now like a great river, and you have not given me wings like yours.
The reader may remember, that in our description of this grove we mentioned a murmuring brook, which brook did not come there, as such gentle streams flow through vulgar romances, with no other purpose than to murmur.
Now on his way home he had to cross a plank lying across a running brook.
On letting it go he observed that a portion of it adhered to his fingers, and running to a brook in great alarm he proceeded to wash it off.