brownfield

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Related to Brown field: Brown Field Investment

brown·field

 (broun′fēld′)
n.
A piece of industrial or commercial property that is abandoned or underused and often environmentally contaminated, especially one considered as a potential site for redevelopment.

brownfield

(ˈbraʊnˌfiːld)
n
(Sociology) (modifier) denoting or located in an urban area that has previously been built on: Hampshire has many brownfield developments.

brown•field

(ˈbraʊnˌfild)
n.
an industrial or commercial site that is idle or underused because of real or perceived environmental pollution.
[1975–80]
Translations

brownfield

[ˈbraʊnfiːld] ADJ [site, land] → previamente urbanizado
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References in periodicals archive ?
He quite rightly identified the vast tracts of brown field sites laying fallow while developers are given the opportunity to build on our green spaces.
He then goes on to state: "For our part, we have lobbied relentlessly to ensure that brown field sites are brought forward.
about two miles (three kilometers) northeast of Brown Field Municipal Airport, according to Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.
AT first glance whilst reading the suggestion of Jonathan Arnott UKIP MEP (Journal, June 8) that a register for brown field sites should be in place I found myself actually agreeing with him.
It is Cardiff Plaid's policy to protect our green fields by building on brown field sites and spreading the development across the region.
The growth of the North America well intervention market is attributed to the revitalization of ageing brown field wells.
This allows the Mayor to claim that substantial numbers of new houses built on playing fields are Brown Field development.
Mr Johnson suggested developers should use up all the available brown field locations first.
The Peel Holdings development proposal is based on a successful business model which has been employed on a number of prestigious brown field development projects in the North of England.
So the Maze will remain a brown field site for as long as the inability to agree continues at Stormont.
This is a significant step to creating a favorable climate and providing conditions for realization of the brown field investments, which will be useful to both foreign and domestic businessmen, he said.
Like many politicians Birmingham Council quote currently available brown field land as if this was the sum total of what will become available.