Brownian movement


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Brownian movement

(ˈbraʊnɪən) or

Brownian motion

n
(General Physics) random movement of microscopic particles suspended in a fluid, caused by bombardment of the particles by molecules of the fluid. First observed in 1827, it provided strong evidence in support of the kinetic theory of molecules
[C19: named after Robert Brown]

Brownian movement

The random motion of microscopic particles suspended in a gas or liquid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brownian movement - the random motion of small particles suspended in a gas or liquidBrownian movement - the random motion of small particles suspended in a gas or liquid
motion, movement - a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something
References in periodicals archive ?
Our first stimulation demonstrated cooperative action among several myosin molecules when they undergo biased Brownian movement under asymmetric potential, which is depicted in Fig.
"The idea that the Brownian movement of individuals is somehow there on tablets of stone in Brussels is a complete nonsense," said Mr Johnson.
How superdiffusion gets arrested: ecological encounters explain shift from Levy to Brownian movement. Proc.
So we can study the degradation phenomena by stochastic processes which represent a mathematical structure used to model different phenomena; stochastic models have been many articles recent decades especially the degradation models continues, the three most frequently studied models are the following: gamma process, Poisson compound, and the Brownian movement that this article will serve to define the Wiener processes and their application in predictive maintenance.
where S is underlying asset price, Y is instantaneous variance of underlying asset price, and d[W.sub.S] is a Brownian movement. The variance Y derived by
[15.] Humphries, N., et al., "Environmental context explains Levy and Brownian movement patterns of marine predators," Nature, Vol.
Students observe the effect of temperature change on Brownian movement at the molecular level.
This result is not more surprising than identity of regularities at measurements of Brownian movement and radioactivity; or radioactivity and noises in semiconductor schemes [10, 11].