Browning

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brown

 (broun)
n.
Any of a group of colors between red and yellow in hue that are medium to low in lightness and low to moderate in saturation.
adj. brown·er, brown·est
1. Of the color brown.
2.
a. Having a brownish or dark skin color.
b. Often Offensive Of or being a person of nonwhite origin.
3. Deeply suntanned.
tr. & intr.v. browned, brown·ing, browns
1. To make or become brown.
2. To cook until brown.
Phrasal Verb:
brown off Chiefly British Slang
To make angry or irritated.

[Middle English, from Old English brūn; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

brown′ish adj.
brown′ness n.

Brown·ing

 (brou′nĭng), Elizabeth Barrett 1806-1861.
British poet. Overcoming ill health and the jealous objections of her tyrannical father, she eloped to Italy with Robert Browning and married him in 1846. Her greatest work, Sonnets from the Portuguese (1850), is a sequence of love poems written to her husband.

Browning

, John Moses 1855-1926.
American firearms inventor whose designs include repeating rifles, automatic pistols, and a machine gun dubbed "the Peacemaker" that was used in the Spanish-American War and adapted for aerial warfare in World War I.

Browning

, Robert 1812-1889.
British poet best known for dramatic monologues such as "My Last Duchess," "Fra Lippo Lippi," and "The Bishop Orders His Tomb." His work, including his masterpiece, The Ring and the Book (1868-1869), explored new ways of using diction and poetic rhythm.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

browning

(ˈbraʊnɪŋ)
n
(Cookery) Brit a substance used to darken soups, gravies, etc

Browning

(ˈbraʊnɪŋ)
n
1. (Biography) Elizabeth Barrett. 1806–61, English poet and critic; author of the Sonnets from the Portuguese (1850)
2. (Biography) her husband, Robert. 1812–89, English poet, noted for his dramatic monologues and The Ring and the Book (1868–69)

Browning

(ˈbraʊnɪŋ)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) Also called: Browning automatic rifle a portable gas-operated air-cooled automatic rifle using .30 calibre ammunition and capable of firing between 200 and 350 rounds per minute. Abbreviation: BAR
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) Also called: Browning machine gun a water-cooled automatic machine gun using .30 or .50 calibre ammunition and capable of firing over 500 rounds per minute
[C20: named after John M. Browning (1855–1926), American designer of firearms]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Brown•ing

(ˈbraʊ nɪŋ)

n.
1. Elizabeth Barrett, 1806–61, English poet.
2. John Moses, 1855–1926, U.S. designer of firearms.
3. Robert, 1812–89, English poet.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Browning - United States inventor of firearms (especially automatic pistols and repeating rifles and a machine gun called the Peacemaker) (1855-1926)
2.Browning - English poet and husband of Elizabeth Barrett Browning noted for his dramatic monologues (1812-1889)Browning - English poet and husband of Elizabeth Barrett Browning noted for his dramatic monologues (1812-1889)
3.Browning - English poet best remembered for love sonnets written to her husband Robert Browning (1806-1861)Browning - English poet best remembered for love sonnets written to her husband Robert Browning (1806-1861)
4.Browning - cooking to a brown crispiness over a fire or on a grillbrowning - cooking to a brown crispiness over a fire or on a grill; "proper toasting should brown both sides of a piece of bread"
cookery, cooking, preparation - the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

browning

[ˈbraʊnɪŋ] N (Brit) (Culin) → aditamento m colorante
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

browning

n (Cook: = act) → Anbraten nt; (= substance)Bratensoße f, → Bratenpulver nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
At this stage of the conflict the ARVN was armed primarily with American supplied WWII surplus weaponry including the M1 Garand rifle, M1/M2 Carbine, BAR, M3 submachine gun, 1911A1 pistols and various .30 and .50 caliber Browning machine guns. The first American advisors, primarily Special Forces personnel, were armed with M2 Carbines and M1911A1 pistols.
The 1965 DB5 has Browning machine guns, wheel-hub tyreslashers, a bullet-proof screen and battering rams on the bumper.
Armament: Guns: 13 x .50 in (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns in nine positions (two in the Bendix chin turret, two on nose cheeks, two staggered waist guns, two in upper Sperry turret, two in Sperry ball turret in belly, two in the tail and one firing upwards from radio compartment behind bomb bay) Bombs: Short range missions (<400 miles): 8,000 pounds (3,600 kilograms); Long range missions ([approximately equal to]800 miles): 4,500 pounds (2,000 kilograms); Overload: 17,600 pounds (7,800 kilograms)
In 2004 we started transitioning from the XM-218 and GAU-16, which are basically Second World-era M2 Browning machine guns, to the GAU-21A which gives a greater rate-of-fire and greater reliability than previous types, particularly in the desert environment.
Browning machine guns have a unique feature possessed almost by no other.
Stevens Arms Company," and used its production capacity to build Mosin-Nagants for the Russians and Browning machine guns for the Americans.
Browning machine guns in the wings was not successful.
The maximum bomb load was 14,000lbs and they were also armed with Browning machine guns in nose, dorsal and tail turrets.
They include a bullet-proof shield, revolving number plates, replica Browning machine guns hidden behind the front sidelights, a radar tracking device - decades before GPS technology - an ejector seat and an oil slick sprayer and nail spreader.