Browning

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brown

 (broun)
n.
Any of a group of colors between red and yellow in hue that are medium to low in lightness and low to moderate in saturation.
adj. brown·er, brown·est
1. Of the color brown.
2.
a. Having a brownish or dark skin color.
b. Often Offensive Of or being a person of nonwhite origin.
3. Deeply suntanned.
tr. & intr.v. browned, brown·ing, browns
1. To make or become brown.
2. To cook until brown.
Phrasal Verb:
brown off Chiefly British Slang
To make angry or irritated.

[Middle English, from Old English brūn; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

brown′ish adj.
brown′ness n.

Brown·ing

 (brou′nĭng), Elizabeth Barrett 1806-1861.
British poet. Overcoming ill health and the jealous objections of her tyrannical father, she eloped to Italy with Robert Browning and married him in 1846. Her greatest work, Sonnets from the Portuguese (1850), is a sequence of love poems written to her husband.

Browning

, John Moses 1855-1926.
American firearms inventor whose designs include repeating rifles, automatic pistols, and a machine gun dubbed "the Peacemaker" that was used in the Spanish-American War and adapted for aerial warfare in World War I.

Browning

, Robert 1812-1889.
British poet best known for dramatic monologues such as "My Last Duchess," "Fra Lippo Lippi," and "The Bishop Orders His Tomb." His work, including his masterpiece, The Ring and the Book (1868-1869), explored new ways of using diction and poetic rhythm.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

browning

(ˈbraʊnɪŋ)
n
(Cookery) Brit a substance used to darken soups, gravies, etc

Browning

(ˈbraʊnɪŋ)
n
1. (Biography) Elizabeth Barrett. 1806–61, English poet and critic; author of the Sonnets from the Portuguese (1850)
2. (Biography) her husband, Robert. 1812–89, English poet, noted for his dramatic monologues and The Ring and the Book (1868–69)

Browning

(ˈbraʊnɪŋ)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) Also called: Browning automatic rifle a portable gas-operated air-cooled automatic rifle using .30 calibre ammunition and capable of firing between 200 and 350 rounds per minute. Abbreviation: BAR
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) Also called: Browning machine gun a water-cooled automatic machine gun using .30 or .50 calibre ammunition and capable of firing over 500 rounds per minute
[C20: named after John M. Browning (1855–1926), American designer of firearms]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Brown•ing

(ˈbraʊ nɪŋ)

n.
1. Elizabeth Barrett, 1806–61, English poet.
2. John Moses, 1855–1926, U.S. designer of firearms.
3. Robert, 1812–89, English poet.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Browning - United States inventor of firearms (especially automatic pistols and repeating rifles and a machine gun called the Peacemaker) (1855-1926)
2.Browning - English poet and husband of Elizabeth Barrett Browning noted for his dramatic monologues (1812-1889)Browning - English poet and husband of Elizabeth Barrett Browning noted for his dramatic monologues (1812-1889)
3.Browning - English poet best remembered for love sonnets written to her husband Robert Browning (1806-1861)Browning - English poet best remembered for love sonnets written to her husband Robert Browning (1806-1861)
4.Browning - cooking to a brown crispiness over a fire or on a grillbrowning - cooking to a brown crispiness over a fire or on a grill; "proper toasting should brown both sides of a piece of bread"
cookery, cooking, preparation - the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

browning

[ˈbraʊnɪŋ] N (Brit) (Culin) → aditamento m colorante
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

browning

n (Cook: = act) → Anbraten nt; (= substance)Bratensoße f, → Bratenpulver nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Browning is justly chargeable with "obscurity"--with a difficulty of manner, that is, beyond the intrinsic difficulty of his matter--it is very probable that an Introduction to the study of his works, such as this of Mr.
Browning, among English poets, second to Shakespeare alone--"He comes very near the gigantic total of [43] Shakespeare." The quantity of his work?
Browning's chosen subject-matter: "Every man is for him an epitome of the universe, a centre of creation." It is always the particular soul, and the particular act or episode, as the flower of the particular soul--the act or episode by which its quality comes to the test--in which he interests us.
It made me think of Browning's `cord of gold' and `gorgeous snake'!"
Browning, 1806- Charlotte Bronte, Carlyle, 1795-1881.
"Don't tell my aunt that I said it"--he sank his voice to a whisper--"I hate Browning."
One need not question the greatness of Browning in owning the fact that the two poets of his day who preeminently voiced their generation were Tennyson and Longfellow; though Browning, like Emerson, is possibly now more modern than either.
But the impression of that fleeting glimpse lingered, and when the time came for him to beat a stumbling retreat and go, she lent him the volume of Swinburne, and another of Browning - she was studying Browning in one of her English courses.
Beowulf to Browning," she repeated, "I think that is the kind of title which might catch one's eye on a railway book-stall."
To my utter astonishment--for I was not yet accustomed to the action of the Watch "all smiles ceased', (as Browning says) on the four pretty faces, and they all got out pieces of needle-work, and sat down.
He moved in the most intellectual circles: he read Browning with enthusiasm and turned up his well-shaped nose at Tennyson; he knew all the details of Shelley's treatment of Harriet; he dabbled in the history of art (on the walls of his rooms were reproductions of pictures by G.
Beyond "Fra Lippo Lippi" and "Caliban and Setebos," he found nothing in Browning, while George Meredith was ever his despair.