Brownism


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Brownism

the views and doctrines of Robert Browne, the first formulator of the principles of Congregationalism. — Brownist, n. — Brownistic, adj.
See also: Protestantism
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Brownism may have been long abandoned, but there's never been a more pressing time to bring it back.
(Quoted in Wintour, 2004) Brownism remained as yet untested and, thanks to Brown's shrewd political positioning, there was undoubtedly support in Renewal and among the wider left for a Brownish regime.
Many of his sermons thundered against the twin evils of Brownism and Anabaptism--so stridently, in fact, that there were complaints that he preached excessively about the topic.
According to the theology of Robert Browne, who articulated the principles of Brownism (later called Independency or Congregationalism), each church was to be a "gathered church" of truly converted Christians who could demonstrate their faith through a conversion narrative.
As to recent history, from 1979 onwards, right-wing policies have dominated from Thatcherism, Majorism, Blairism to Brownism.
Janet Daley argued that it all started to fall apart earlier than this at the Labour Party's conference when "the awful reality dawned on every journalist present (even those whose sympathies were with Brownism): neither Mr Brown nor his ministers had anything of interest to say."
In Christ all special priestly powers had been abolished, and all Christians were equally priests or equally laymen." As they negotiated their way between the Scylla of authoritative presbyterial government," and the Charybdis of anarchic "Brownism," non-Separatists, who, despite the confusing terminology, were the theological and spiritual forebears of Backus and other Calvinistic Baptists, sought a "middle way" that would be faithful to the "priesthood of all believers" concept and at the same time maintain unity and order.
Yet would 'Brownism without the flaws of Brown' really have succeeded as a political strategy?
TONY Blair finished his last Prime Minister's Questions with: "That's it, the end." As soon as he said that people were talking of "Brownism".
And no one ever talked about "Brownism" - because he achieved his social vision by degrees, with few noticing.
But he is keenly aware he is unlikely to have an uninterrupted decade in power in which to roll out Brownism. When he does call a (very possibly early) election there is the real possibility victory may be snatched by the Conservatives.