Brownist


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Brownist

(ˈbraʊnɪst)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who supported the principles of church government advocated by Robert Browne and adopted in modified form by the Independents or Congregationalists
[C16: named after Robert Browne (?1550–1633), English Puritan]
ˈBrownism n
References in classic literature ?
They were sometimes called Separatists because they separated themselves from the church of England, sometimes Brownists after the name of one of their eminent ministers.
88) Having observed Neal's opinion of English Baptists in The History of the Puritans, it is surprising that he failed to identify Williams (whom he regarded as a "rigid Brownist, precise, uncharitable, and of such turbulent and boisterous Passions, as had like to have put the whole Country to Flame") as a Baptist.
56) Smyth's journey from England to Holland, and his religious pilgrimage from the Church of England to Puritanism, to Brownist Separatism, and then finally to Anabaptism, is a colorful story in religious history.
Lawrence and install a Brownist colony--a not inconsequential tidbit, given that Nicholls tells us Brownists, a breakaway congregational sect of the Church of England, were part of Lord Ochiltree's Cape Breton colony in 1629.
A complete analysis must give attention to the Anabaptists and other radical sects in Europe, and especially to the Brownist and Baptist groups in England, which contributed an important part to American foundations.
41) The recantation of a Brownist (London, 1606), sig.
The distinction which Burnet drew between the moderate Dissenters (religious descendants of the Puritans) and the separatist Dissenters (in the Brownist tradition) provides us with the key to the Latitudinarians' objection to the bill against occasional conformity.
WHITE, THE ENGLISH SEPARATIST TRADITION: FROM THE MARIAN MARTYRS TO THE PILGRIM FATHERS (1971); and Verne Dale Morey, The Brownist Churches: A Study in English Separatism, 1553-1630 (1954) (unpublished Ph.
8) His departure, however, did not shield Joan from scrutiny by the British officials for she was soon arrested and imprisoned in York, accused of being a Brownist and charged with refusing to take an oath of loyalty to the Church of England.
A measure of stability provided by the long incumbency of the Jacobean bishop, John Jegon, was undercut by a seemingly ineradicable tradition of separatism and dissent, stemming from the Brownist movement of the 1580s.
White, The English Separatist Tradition: From the Marian Martyrs to the Pilgrim Fathers (London: Oxford University Press, 1971); and Verne Dale Morey, The Brownist Churches: A Study in English Separatism, 1553-1630 (unpublished Ph.
Along with the Puritans as such, also other non-conformist sectarian factions like the Brownists emigrated to New England.