Brownist

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Brownist

(ˈbraʊnɪst)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who supported the principles of church government advocated by Robert Browne and adopted in modified form by the Independents or Congregationalists
[C16: named after Robert Browne (?1550–1633), English Puritan]
ˈBrownism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
They were sometimes called Separatists because they separated themselves from the church of England, sometimes Brownists after the name of one of their eminent ministers.
Along with the Puritans as such, also other non-conformist sectarian factions like the Brownists emigrated to New England.
(62) Neal's typology of the Brownists was important in relation to the advent of the Baptists of England.
Seventeenth-century Holland, as Pierre Bayle wrote, was a "great ark of the refugees."(4) Out of Amsterdam's population of about 50,000 in the early seventeenth century, well over 1,000 were "overseas Englishmen"(5) and many of these ended up "beyond the Reguliers Gate." Nonconforming English Puritans, Brownists, and Anabaptists, as well as Catholics and some run-of-the-mill English immigrants without pronounced religious views, mingled with the surrounding Dutch population in the neighborhood, which was no doubt equally diverse.
Lawrence and install a Brownist colony--a not inconsequential tidbit, given that Nicholls tells us Brownists, a breakaway congregational sect of the Church of England, were part of Lord Ochiltree's Cape Breton colony in 1629.
Sprunger, "The Meeting of Dutch Anabaptists and English Brownists, Reported by P.
(6) Still, Peter Milward remarks, "he is described by Maria as 'a kind of Puritan,' which means--for all the learned reservations of commentators--still a Puritan, if not quite so extreme as the Brownists [...]" ("The Religious Dimension" 382).
He founded a religious movement called the Brownists, with communities in Norwich and the Netherlands.
from the first beginnings of these Disputes down to the present time, they [the Dissenters] have been always called on to come as near the Church as they could, and to do all that they could do with a Good Conscience: And therefore before the Wars, great difference was made between the Puritans, and the Brownists or Separatists, on this very account.
In the later sixteenth and seventeenth centuries various non-Anglican Protestant groups in England--Puritans, Brownists, Independents, and other self-styled "Separatists" (43)--had called the English church and state to a greater separation from each other and from the Church of Rome.
(110) Separatists (also known as Brownists) took the matter further, insisting that the Anglican Church as it stood was not a true church and that complete separation from it was a Protestant obligation.
His first published work appeared anonymously in 1641, issued under two separate titles: A New Petition of the Papists and The Humble Petition of the Brownists. The writing contained within each is identical.