Brumaire


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Brumaire

(brymɛr)
n
(Historical Terms) the month of mist: the second month of the French revolutionary calendar, extending from Oct 23 to Nov 21
[C19: from brume mist, from Latin brūma winter; see brume]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brumaire - second month of the Revolutionary calendar (October and November); the month of mist
Revolutionary calendar - the calendar adopted by the first French Republic in 1793 and abandoned in 1805; dates were calculated from Sept. 22, 1792
Revolutionary calendar month - a month in the Revolutionary calendar
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tradition of all dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the brains of the living,' wrote Karl Marx in 'The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte'.
For instance, the "Socio-disciplining selectivity" of the early- to mid-20th century welfare state that Vegh Weis describes had origins in the class conflict of the early English labor movement and in the French revolution of 1848, analyzed at length in "Class Struggle in France" and "The Eighteenth Brumaire," in addition to Capital.
Synopsis: Karl Marx famously wrote in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon that history repeats itself, "first as tragedy, then as farce." The Cold War waged between the United States and Soviet Union from 1945 until the latter's dissolution in 1991 was a great tragedy, resulting in millions of civilian deaths in proxy wars, and a destructive arms race that diverted money from social spending and nearly led to nuclear annihilation.
In order to emphasise African agency, Somerville evokes the Marxist maxim from the 18th Brumaire that says "men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please".
History will judge whether the rowdy scenes and fisticuffs on 12 March 2018, in the once sedate and dignified gallery of the Senate of Pakistan, to which the writer of this article was twice nominated, first by Prime Minister Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto in 1975 and on the second occasion, twenty years later by his daughter, Prime Minister Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto as Chairperson of the Pakistan People's Party, it was a tragedy or a farce, to borrow a phrase, from the opening sentence of the 18th Brumaire of Louis Napoleon, an oft quoted satire on politics authored by Karl Marx, to describe the drop scene of the revolutionary fervent in Europe of 1848.
Streeck is drawing here on Marx's The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, in which he argues that figures such as Bonaparte arise when there is a stalemate between the main opposing forces in society.
We should resist the temptation to over-interpret Trump's election as an American Eighteenth Brumaire or 1933.
'The social revolution of the nineteenth century cannot take its poetry from the past but only from the future', Marx declared in The Eighteenth Brumaire (1852).
In this and many other respects, Thompson owed a clear debt to Karl Marx, most particularly to Marx's insistence, in his 1852 essay "The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte," that "[m]en make their own history, but they do not make it just as they please; they do not make it under circumstances chosen by themselves, but under circumstances directly found, given and transmitted from the past" (89).
Now that democracy has become figurable only as representative democracy, Marx's words in the Eighteenth Brumaire about the French peasantry ('they cannot represent themselves ...