Brunhild

(redirected from Brunnehilde)
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Related to Brunnehilde: Valkyrie, Brynhild

Brun·hild

 (bro͞on′hĭlt′)
n.
A queen in the Nibelungenlied whose character generally corresponds to that of the Valkyrie Brynhild of Norse myth.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Brunhild

(ˈbrʊnhɪld; -hɪlt) or

Brünnhilde

n
(European Myth & Legend) (in the Nibelungenlied) a legendary queen won for King Gunther by the magic of Siegfried: corresponds to Brynhild in Norse mythology
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Brun•hild

(ˈbrʊn hɪlt, -hɪld, ˈbrun-)

also Brun•hil•de

(brʊnˈhɪl də)

Brünnhilde



n.
(in the Nibelungenlied) a queen of great beauty and physical strength won by Siegfried for Gunther. See Brynhild.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Brunhild - a Valkyrie or a queen in the Nibelungenlied who loved the hero Siegfried; when he deceived her she had him killed and then committed suicide
mythology - myths collectively; the body of stories associated with a culture or institution or person
Norse mythology - the mythology of Scandinavia (shared in part by Britain and Germany) until the establishment of Christianity
Teuton - a member of the ancient Germanic people who migrated from Jutland to southern Gaul and were annihilated by the Romans
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hans Sachs, the great singer (and shoemaker!), is both a coarse bully and a humane phiosopher; Walther, the young knight, is both a callow and heedless youth as well as a gifted artist; Eva, his love, is at once a tokenized female chattel and a domestic counterpart of Brunnehilde. The story focuses on an idealized brotherhood of medieval mastersingers (men who have qualified for the title by learning how to sing according to a prescribed code of musical ethics; they comprise a healthy, sunny equivalent of the gloomy Grail brotherhood in Parsifal) who are burghers at the same time as they are subtle artists, bound to their art not as professionals but as keepers of a tradition and a craft.