murre

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Related to Brunnich's murre: common murre, dovekie, Uria aalge, Common Guillemot

murre

 (mûr)
n. pl. murre or murres
Either of two large auks, Uria aalge or U. lomvia, having a black back and head and white underparts.

[Earlier, any of various species of guillemots and other auks, probably ultimately imitative of the call of certain guillemots; akin to Scots marrot, murre, razorbill.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

murre

(mɜː)
n
(Animals) US and Canadian any guillemot of the genus Uria
[C17: origin unknown]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

murre

(mɜr)

n.
either of two black and white diving birds of the genus Uria, of the auk family, nesting along rocky coasts of northern seas.
[1595–1605; orig. uncertain]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.murre - black-and-white diving bird of northern seasmurre - black-and-white diving bird of northern seas
guillemot - small black or brown speckled auks of northern seas
genus Uria, Uria - murres
common murre, Uria aalge - the most frequent variety of murre
thick-billed murre, Uria lomvia - a variety of murre
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
2004: Impacts of chronic marine oil pollution and the murre hunt in Newfoundland on Brunnich's murre Uria lomvia populations in the eastern Canadian Arctic.--Biological Conservation 116: 205-216.
His picture of the Brunnich's Murre, a thick-billed sea bird, looks flat and stiff--not unlike his human subjects--because he painted from a specimen that had been sent to him packed in ice.