talegalla

(redirected from Brush-turkey)

talegalla

(ˌtælɪˈɡælə)
n
(Animals) a member of a genus of megapod birds native to Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Australia. Also called: brush-turkey
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
But the giant brush-turkey's size dwarfs the others - Progura gallinacea was as tall as a (http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/species/profiles/mammals/grey_kangaroo/) gray kangaroo , with long, slender legs.
Paleontologists from Flinders University recently identified five large extinct birds called megapodes that are related to animals that can be found today, including the (http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/animals/TheMalleefowl.htm) malleefowl , an endangered ground-dwelling bird roughly the size of a chicken, and (http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/animals/AustralianBrushTurkey.htm) brush-turkeys , known for their dark plumage and bright colors on their heads.
Similarly, Goth and Jones (2001) reported that Australian brush-turkey chicks retain glued radio-transmitters for 21-28 days.
Transmitter attachment and its effects on Australian brush-turkey hatchlings.--Wild.
Gluing has been successfully used to attach transmitters to Australian brush-turkeys Alectura lathami chicks (Goth and Jones 2001) and wild turkey Meleagris gallopavo poults (Spears et al.
and Jones, D.N., 2003.Ontogeny of social behavior in the megapode Australian brush-turkey (Alecturalathami).
The Australian brush-turkey belongs to a family of birds--the megapodes--that has evolved a breeding strategy like no other bird group.
Since brush-turkey chicks don't initially form groups with adults, they are not at risk of offending adults, so do not need to `hide' such behaviours.
Goth investigated predator recognition in brush-turkey chicks to see how they manage once they leave the mound.
Goth thought that chicks might take note of the warning calls of other bird species in lieu of parental calls, since brush-turkey adults, unconventional to the end, do not utter any alarm calls of their own.
The experiment showed that in brush-turkey chicks the alarm calls of other rainforest birds have indeed replaced those of absent parents.
Without parents to show them where and what to eat, how do newly hatched brush-turkey chicks find and identify food?