bucket shop

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bucket shop

n.
1. A fraudulent brokerage operation in which orders to buy and sell are accepted but no executions take place. Instead, the operators expect to profit when customers close out their positions at a loss.
2. A business, such as a travel agency, that buys unsold tickets and resells them at a discount.

[From bucket shop, a saloon selling small amounts of liquor in buckets, from its resemblance to the forerunner of such brokerage operations, which dealt in small units of stocks and commodities.]

bucket shop

n
1. (Stock Exchange) an unregistered firm of stockbrokers that engages in speculation with clients' funds
2. (Commerce) chiefly Brit any small business that cannot be relied upon, esp one selling cheap airline tickets

buck′et shop`


n.
Informal. an overly aggressive brokerage house, esp. one that sells low-priced, highly speculative stocks by telephone.
[1870–75, Amer.; orig. a cheap drinking establishment]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bucket shop - an unethical or overly aggressive brokerage firm
brokerage, brokerage firm, securities firm - a stock broker's business; charges a fee to act as intermediary between buyer and seller
2.bucket shop - (formerly) a cheap saloon selling liquor by the bucket
tap house, tavern - a building with a bar that is licensed to sell alcoholic drinks
References in periodicals archive ?
And the current weakness is not because of alleged bucket shops producing so-called low-tech product but rather because of the extreme frailty of one of the most important links in the supply chain: raw material suppliers.
market in 1907 was something called "the bucket shops," which were betting saloons where people could spend the day, take out highly leveraged loans and make side bets on the performance of the markets.
Buy through travel agents, rather than internet bucket shops.
Some claim first class travel to Brussels and Strasbourg - and buy cheap tickets from bucket shops.